Q & A with Jan Jones: How Executive Assistants Get Their Executives to see Them as a “Business Partner”

In this article, Author Jan Jones discusses how Executive Assistants can work to be seen as a business partner to their Executives.

 FlyPrivate is a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings
valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do! 

FlyPrivate: How can executive assistants get their executives to see them as a “Business Partner?” What are some things executives do that show they respect their assistant as a business partner?

Jan Jones: I’m repeatedly asked “How can I be a secret weapon if my executive doesn’t see assistants that way?” “I can’t get my executive to notice me and acknowledge my contribution.” “My executive doesn’t know how to use me.” “How can I be a business partner to an executive who wants to do everything herself?”

The answer to the first part of your question is not straightforward, and these questions from assistants clearly demonstrate that. There are many misconceptions and misunderstandings about the term “business partner”, that present a barrier to the title being widely acknowledged and used, with respect to the EA role.

A major hurdle in that effort is that many executives – across the age spectrum and across the world – are reluctant to bestow the title, or consider the idea that their assistant is their business partner. When I’m consulting with those executives, I allay their concerns by
suggesting they view it for what it is – a collaboration, an alliance
between the executive and assistant, rather than seeing it as an
assistant giving themselves airs, or trying to presume an authority, or legitimacy they don’t have.

While there is a strong push by EA advocates in western countries for the title, I hear from our EA colleagues in other parts of the world that their executives won’t countenance such a title for an assistant. Indeed, in parts of the world assistants continue to be called
“secretary”, although that may be because the title is closer to the job being done, rather than disrespect towards the person
performing it, or the profession as a whole. I know cultural norms are a source of dismay for assistants in some countries. But our EA colleagues in exotic lands should take heart because Adam Fidler, the UK’s premier EA trainer, says that many UK executives also
resist calling an assistant a business partner. It’s not only a cultural impediment, other factors are in play. But that’s a lengthy discussion to be had at another time.

As we see from these EA questions, too many executives are
unaware about the caliber of assistance an assistant brings to the table. And the truth is, a percentage of executives don’t require or want that level of assistance. Often, it’s the executives who are
conversant with technology, but have yet to determine how they can widen the scope of their own jobs, beyond the task-based way they are currently doing it. They are so deep on their treadmill of
churning it out and getting it done, that they can’t stop for a moment to delegate, collaborate, or consider there may be an alternative. Many of these executives have never had an assistant before, they’ve never seen assistants who are role models of effectiveness, they’ve never been taught the purpose and value of an effective
assistant. So they can’t immediately see how an assistant can be of service to them.

Assistants: You’ve got a job to do educating your executives on the role you play and what you can do. Just because they’ve hired you, doesn’t mean they know how to use all the features that come with a product like you. They’ve bought something and have yet to read and understand the how-to manual.

My unending mantra to assistants is: Showing is Better Than Telling. Show them what you can do. Until you show them, they won’t know. Many have no idea because they’ve never seen it done. They don’t know that it can be done, let alone how it can be done. It’s up to you. Realize that partners don’t wait to be told what to do. They know what the business requires and they do whatever it takes. Business partners have an investment in the business. They have financial skin in the game. What’s your stake in the business in which you work? How are you helping to grow and build that business the way a financial business partner would? What are you bringing to the partnership in return for asking to be called a “partner?” This is an important question that you should be asking yourself. How are you stepping up to the role of business partner?

Showing is Better Than Telling. That’s why I wrote my book for
executives and not for assistants. It’s deliberately called “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders And Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness.” I did that because executives need to be educated on what an assistant can do. They need to realize they have a secret weapon ready for deployment right beside them. And it’s the job of every assistant to demonstrate every single day, just what an assistant can do. If you don’t teach them, how will they learn? That’s what I did with my executives. I showed them more and better ways to utilize the depth of my expertise. I demonstrated that I clearly understood the business, what they were trying to achieve and how I could add value. You can do that by speaking intelligently, using the language of the business or the industry. Make pertinent suggestions. Bring relevant matters to their attention. If you can
relieve them of making one more decision, do it. You have to play the role of educator. You can’t sit back passively and wait for people who haven’t got a clue, to magically get a clue. People believe what they see more than they believe what they hear. So let them see what you can do.

One highly experienced assistant was struggling to get her
executive’s attention to discuss how she could help this new
executive. Every time she tried, her executive would push her away with some excuse. And then it was another, and another thing that she just could not look up from. I suggested the assistant make a list of all areas she saw where she could take tasks away from the
executive. Give specific examples: Here are some areas where I
notice… Let them see exactly where they are getting bogged down, and how you can help them to reclaim that precious time. Give them the list and let them look it over at their convenience. Let them know you’d be happy to discuss when they are ready. Meanwhile, you keep performing to the very best of your ability and keep siphoning off things that you can handle to make their load lighter.

At one point in my career, while I was deciding on my next move, I did temporary work. I covered for assistants who were on vacation, maternity leave, sick leave, or while the executive was interviewing for a new assistant. Guess how many job offers I got. When I arrived at those organizations, I didn’t sit back and wait for the executive to give me tasks to perform. I immediately set about finding out how I could make it an easy transition for them. Some EAs, particularly the ones going on vacation, who didn’t want to come back to a mess, left helpful directions. But not always. I would start by checking out what was in their In-tray to see what action needed to be taken, and the Out-tray to see what had been completed and what needed to happen next. I looked at the correspondence. I went through the files, their contacts, everything that would get me immediately
familiar with that EA’s job. Then, with my list of questions, I would ask for time with the executive so I could get some direction and get down to work. Many were surprised at my proactive stance and most welcomed it. I heard repeated whispers that they were getting more work out of me than they got from their assistant. Those
executives got a long-overdue lesson in how an enterprising
assistant takes charge of her role. They needed to be shown – this is what I can do for you. For the middle managers who didn’t want to use me (their work was too important to give to a mere temp), I showed them the meaning of important. I would go to the chief
executive’s assistant, introduce myself and ask if I could help them. 99% of the time, their grateful answer was “sure”.

Here are some examples of how successful business leaders utilize their assistants as business partners. This is how you want to train and develop your executive. This is how you’ll partner with your
executive, by knowing what the best leaders do and gradually
coaxing your executive into doing the same.

Access: Smart leaders give the assistant full access. This access
allows the assistant to understand the business, their executive’s priorities, what they like or don’t like. The assistant learns by directly observing the executive’s decision-making process, their style of communication, their values and interests. This perspective will give you a compass for how to act on your executive’s behalf. Assistants who are granted access to their executive don’t hesitate to act as their proxy when required. Get around your executive. Show
interest. Ask questions. Make suggestions. Encourage your
executive to relinquish tasks to you. If you have to start small, then start small, but start.

Autonomy: Good leaders know when to become immersed in the details and when they should let someone else take the lead. They hire the right person and trust them to get the job done. These
executives share the vision, mission and goals and trust their
assistant to use their experience, skills and creativity to take it from there. If your executive hasn’t been loosening the reins, ask yourself why. Is it because they are micromanagers and mistrusting, or have you not shown any inclination or ability to be autonomous and make good decisions? If you are waiting for your executive to “let” you, you’ll be a long time waiting.

Confidence: Strong leaders boost their assistant’s confidence and give them opportunities to show initiative and learn new things. They notice what you do and give you credit. If you make a mistake, they guide you towards a better way. The best way to gain
confidence is to start taking on projects and working independently. The more you do, the more confident you’ll become. Don’t hesitate to ask for guidance if you don’t know, or if you run into trouble. Get accustomed to speaking up and sharing your opinion. Easy does it at first. Test the waters before you start dishing out advice or
suggestions, unless you are certain of what you are talking about and how it will be received. Even if your executive doesn’t respond to your initiative, keep practicing how to expand your reach, work independently and get involved. It will increase your value and help you as you progress in your career.

Kudos: Smart leaders champion their people and recognize their
efforts. They understand the caliber of performance you are
delivering and never take you for granted. They don’t hesitate to say thank you, or praise you for stellar performance and reward you with increased responsibility, remuneration, or something more
immediate like time off. Even in my first job, when I was a junior
secretary, my boss would once in a while give me an “early mark”. That’s Aussie-speak for leave early. A consideration so appreciated by a young woman who was working hard to learn the ropes and
impress her employers. It told me my efforts were being noticed and rewarded.

Respect: Top business leaders show courtesy and consideration to their assistant – in public and private. They listen to you. They value your input. They treat you as a professional.

Gratitude: Tuned-in leaders acknowledge the immense job their
assistants do on their behalf. Time after time, leaders have told me they could never do what they do without their assistant. In my book, management guru Ken Blanchard remarked, “Assistants give you the capacity to do so much more.” Great leaders remember to express their thanks, show consideration and once in a while, look for ways to reward their assistants.

These are some habits that for generations have enabled
extraordinary leaders to function at optimum levels, working
effectively with their exceptional assistants. If a mind shift is going to happen, it’s going to come from you and through you, dear
assistant. How successfully your executive makes the transition to seeing and accepting you as a “business partner”, is in your hands. The goal is to be treated as a professional, a respected business partner, with or without it being your official title.


©The CEO’s Secret Weapon. The ideas expressed in this article and any text extracted from “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” are the,
intellectual property and copyrighted to Jan Jones. All rights
reserved. No unauthorized usage or duplication by any means is permitted without the express consent of the author.

Author: Jan Jones

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New
Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received
widespread acclaim from executives and executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed international
executive assistant to well-known business people, including
personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is
passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless, practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ book and visit her website:
The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their
Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

The Road Show

Photo credits: Gulfstream Aerospace

Sooner or later you need to be in several places at the same time. In fact these visits maybe overdue; Portfolio company, plant and branch location site visits, investor and M&A discussions are just a few of the reasons you may need to schedule a road trip, we can help you do it  SAFELY. 

Why fly privately? There are many reasons to FlyPrivate.
Here are the most compelling:

1. Health

Even before COVID-19, anyone who spends a prolonged period of time on the road can attest, traveling comes with inherent health concerns. Commercial airliners, terminal lavatories, armrests,
drinking fountains, and escalators handrails consistently rank as some of the most germ infested public areas. Using private aviation will reduce your exposure to contagious health risks. 

2. Save time…AND make money. 

We routinely take 5-day commercial itineraries and reduce them to 2 or 3 days. This not only saves time but adds back days of
productivity. The value of your time or an executive team’s can easily exceed $19,000 per day. This savings of travel time, replaced with
increased days of productivity, more than pays for the investment in a private charter.

3. Privacy and Security

Most M&A, IPO, and other investor discussions have a need for
privacy. It can pay big dividends to move as invisibly as possible. Use of a private unmarked aircraft to a private airfield will not broadcast your arrival and departure. The private aircraft itself can be used as a secure conference room allowing for additional planning and preparation. If you need enroute, pre or post-meeting
communication, ask about aircraft with Wi-Fi capability.

4. Schedule Flexibility

Some of the most critical elements to your trip are highly
unpredictable. Whether it is last minute news, availability of a
principal, lab results, or the development of a prototype, meeting times can change. Use of private aviation allows you to revise an
itinerary to suit your agenda. This type of adaptability could be the added measure to achieve success.

At FlyPrivate we are roadshow experts. Benefit from our national aircraft options and logistical experience and make your next road trip pay big dividends.

Our service is “pay as you fly”, there is no membership to join.

Please contact us with the details for your next potential road trip.

Flight Request

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Your Jet Set Pet

Pets & Jets: What You Need to Know

1. Always tell us in advance if you plan to travel with your pet. We want to ensure that your aircraft is pet friendly and the crew is not allergic to pets.

2. Keep in mind that the rules and regulations will change if you’re flying internationally and each country does have varying laws about the importation of pets.

3. Bring a small, carry-on kennel or crate so your pet is safe during take-off and landing. Most jets allow dogs to fly outside of the crate by their owners’ side during the rest of the flight, as long as they are well behaved.

4. If traveling with your dog, bring a harness in case there is
turbulence on the flight. This will allow the dog to be strapped to a designated seating area with his owner.

5. Bring a cozy blanket your dog can use as a bed during the flight. The blanket will also help protect the seats on the jet from damage.

6. If you’re flying during your pet’s mealtime, be sure to pack food for your dog or we will be happy to arrange to have dog treats on the flight.

7. You may also wish to bring a quiet toy or bone to keep your dog occupied and quiet during the flight.

8. Make sure your pet gets a bathroom break before boarding the aircraft. If you’re planning a longer trip and need a stop-over during your flight to give your dog a break, let us know in advance and we will arrange this for you.

Photo courtesy of the Robb Report

Flying with Pets in the U.S.

The US Department of Transportation and the Department of
Agriculture has the following guidelines for flying with pets within the United States:

1. Dogs & cats must be at least 8 weeks old.
2. Animals must already have been weaned.
3. You must carry proof of a rabies vaccination.
4. Each State has specific Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Dog Pilot_background

Our experts are always at your service. Please contact us if you have any questions about pet-friendly flights or if we can help you book your next trip.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on: 

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Where Are You Headed This Fall?

It’s that time again…The leaves are beginning to change, the
temperature is getting cooler, and many of you are planning your fall migration to your winter homes and holiday vacation trips.

We are ready and at your service for your next trip and strongly
encourage you to contact us now for your best flight options and pricing. Private aviation is very popular at this time of year
(especially this year) and we want to make sure you get the aircraft you need, when you need it. If you have already booked your fall flights with us, thank you! We greatly appreciate your business.

If you have tentative dates, please contact us and we can begin to provide you with options with the best pricing.

Flight Quote Request

For those new to private aviation, FlyPrivate has many benefits to you, your family and/or fellow travelers.

  • Significantly reduce your door to door travel time.
  • Experience the unmatched comfort and luxury of private jet
    charter, especially ideal for anyone who travel has become more difficult for due to mobility, pets, baggage or other matters.
  • See how our unique business model sets us apart from the rest. Here are 15 Reasons to FlyPrivate.

Please call or email our Client Services team right away so we can provide you with the best flight options and quotes to suit your trip.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

15 Reasons to FlyPrivate

Photo credits: Bombardier

What we do for you every day:

  • Provide you “ownership” type service for personal or business travel
  • 24/7 Client Service Support
  • Bring you the best aircraft values through our trusted
    relationships
  • Deliver the best one-way options
  • Deliver discounted round trip options
  • Realize substantial long term savings with our flexible “pay as you fly” business model
  • Provide pre-trip, “hard number” all inclusive pricing
  • Pre-paid discount program
  • Offer the FlyPrivate Mobile App for easy booking
  • Provide International Service 
  • Capitalize on 20 years of experience to creatively keep trip costs down and improve value
  • Act as your trusted partner in private aviation
  • Provide a hassle free shopping process – we do the shopping for you
  • Track weather and other flight operational elements
  • Treat your trip as if it was our own

Please consider using FlyPrivate® for your future private travel.

Contact us for more information. 

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

A Super-Mid Favorite: Challenger 300

The Challenger 300, made by Canadian manufacturer Bombardier, delivers a large cabin aircraft with lower direct operating costs than anything else in the super-midsize jet category. According to
Bombardier, “the aircraft was crafted for true U.S. coast-to-coast range and features unmatched room in which to conference and work.” Customers rave about the cabin size. It is longer than a
Challenger 604 and as wide as a Gulfstream IV for additional space and comfort.

Challenger 300

When launching the concept in Paris in 1997, Bombardier revealed it had done unprecedented research into operator needs for a jet of this size. Initially called The Continental for it’s long range
performance, it was renamed the Challenger 300 at NBAA 2002 and received its certification in 2003. To date, Bombardier has delivered more than 150 different models of aircraft.

An exceptional value, the Challenger 300 seats eight passengers and is equipped with state of the art entertainment systems. It can travel travel non-stop over 3,660 statute miles at a cruise speed of 528 mph.

The interior of the Challenger 300 has a wide, flat floor and enough height (6’1″) for most passengers to stand-up in the cabin, creating a comfortable and productive environment for passengers. The cabin also contains a galley perfect for snacks and light meal service, a state-of-the-art NICE® (Network Integrated Cabin Equipment) electronics system, a full lavatory, and other impressive features for conducting business such as satellite telephones, electrical outlets, two 20” widescreen LCD monitors, a DVD/CD player, and iPod unit that are all standard to the aircraft. This jet also has ample baggage space and in-flight access to a large internal baggage compartment.

To request a Challenger 300 for your next trip, contact us!

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service

Count on the Versatile Challenger 604

The Bombardier Challenger 604 was first certified in 1995 as an
upgrade to previous models in the Challenger family of business jets. The Challenger 604 offers many refinements from earlier
Challenger 600 models and thus has become one of the most sought after and versatile jets in the heavy jet category. The impressive speed, range, comfort and style provide a superior value for business and leisure travelers alike.

The Challenger 604 is a very powerful aircraft with two General Electric CF34-3B engines that allow it to fly coast-to-coast and to some destinations abroad without refueling. This aircraft has a range of around 4,200 statute miles with 8 passengers on board, at an average speed of 515 mph. The Challenger 604 features
state-of-the-art avionics, a glass cockpit, turbulence detection radar, and 6 multifunction display screens, among other pilot-friendly features.

The cabin of the Challenger 604 is very spacious with 6 feet of standing height and measures over 7 feet in width. The cabin space can be configured into a 10-passenger conference space or in a
double-club, forward or half club, or divan arrangement. This
aircraft will accommodate 8-10 passengers comfortably as well as 2 crew members and a flight attendant. The Challenger 604 also has a generous baggage compartment providing 115 cubic feet of
external storage that is accessible during flight. With a fully enclosed lavatory, a first class catering galley, entertainment center, and low cabin noise levels, it is no surprise that the Challenger 604 is a
favorite of many private fliers.

As with many Challenger models, the 604 is a great option for any discerning traveler seeking the ultimate experience in comfort, value, dependability and performance in a heavy jet.

To request a Challenger 604 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be pleased to provide you with a flight quote for your next trip.

Challenger 604 Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: Are Career Transitions Challenging for Executive Assistants?

In this article, Author Jan Jones discusses the challenges associated with career transitions for Executive Assistants.

 FlyPrivate is a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings
valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do! 

FlyPrivate: For over 20 years you were an Executive Assistant for some notable business names. You eventually started your own business. Are career transitions challenging for executive assistants?

Jan Jones: Most executive assistants are happy with their career choice and are not considering transitioning out of the EA career. They feel fortunate to work for a good company that meets their professional needs and provides the opportunities they want. I think many are looking for ways to enhance their role as an EA, rather than transitioning out of the role completely.

From time to time, I do get asked by assistants how I transitioned from being an EA to being a business owner. For most it seems to be a curiosity question, rather than truly considering starting their own business.

I wish I could say I had a plan and I could lay out the steps for people to follow, but that’s not how it happened for me.  I actually didn’t have any plans to leave my career as an assistant and start a
business, but the opportunity came my way and I took it.

Starting a business was something I fell into, much like my career as an executive assistant. It was not my ambition to be an assistant when I was considering college and thinking about a career. It evolved over time and I’m glad it did because when I was traveling around the world, I had no problem getting a good-paying job as an assistant. It’s a profession that travels well and I’m eternally grateful to my father for suggesting I give it a good look. The EA role gave me a breadth of experience and access to high places that few other professions can provide. I urge EAs to grasp the extraordinary
opportunities this profession can offer for long-term career
development, but you must be willing to put in the hard work and prove yourself before doors will swing open.

For assistants who want to know how they can get to higher levels in the EA role, and also for those who are wondering how I transitioned to business ownership, the reason opportunities came to me is
because I had a reputation for excellence, for being extraordinarily creative, diligent and service-oriented. I was always looking for ways to do more, so I could learn more. The words “It’s not my job” never
entered my mind, much less passed my lips. Same with “Pushing back”, or saying “No”. If it was necessary, I found a way to do it myself, or found a way to make it happen. That’s what being resourceful is all about. It’s a skill every executive wants in their assistant and what a business owner needs, especially when you are starting a business. Instead of “No”, I would say “Let me see what I can do,” or “Leave it with me”, and I did my best to accommodate the request. People
respond better to those phrases than “No”. Even if you can’t make it happen, they will know you tried. But don’t use them if you don’t
intend to try, because pretty soon, no one will believe you and you’ll lose credibility. If you think lack of credibility is bad for an EA, it’s
fatal for a business owner. If there is a secret I can share with EAs it is be known as someone who is at the top of their game, someone who is fully invested in sharing the load as a real business partner would. Then people can’t help but notice you for all the right reasons and they’ll seek you out and recommend you for opportunities. All these things will help you if you intend to become a business owner. They’ll certainly help you if you want to become an exceptional
executive assistant.

I’ve said it repeatedly, much of the reason I’m successful in my
business is because every day I use the skills I learned as I evolved from a junior secretary into a high-performing executive assistant. I go to extreme lengths to produce results for my clients just as I did for my executives. I don’t easily take no for an answer and I follow up meticulously. Things don’t get dropped or overlooked. I keep my commitments and people know they can rely on me to do what I say. I gained a reputation for all these traits as I matured into a
top-level assistant.

Whether the transition from EA to business owner is easy or not will depend on what business you go into, and how much homework you’ve done about the market’s need for your product or service. Many EAs are trying out being a business owner by doing virtual EA work. There certainly isn’t a better time for it than now with work-from-home being the norm, since people have become accustomed to seeing home offices set up in bedrooms and kitchens. I would advise assistants to present a more professional look than showing your bed in the background, especially with options like Zoom
Background being available. No matter the circumstance, there’s never an excuse for being sloppy, or coming across as inappropriate or unprepared. No matter how expert you are with the latest Apps and technology, you’ll tarnish your brand if you look unprofessional because working remotely, your clients have no idea how you are treating their customers and what image you are projecting on their behalf.

It takes much more than being a capable administrator to be a
business owner. If you decide to go out on your own, you’ll need an appetite for risk. If you rely on the comfort of a steady income, you might struggle when the bills are due, no money is on the horizon and your savings are dwindling. As you are developing your business, you’ll have times when you are flush and times when you are skint. You need a good product, the ability to market yourself, find solid, preferably long-term clients who provide well-paying, repeat projects. You’ll need to be a confident negotiator and not afraid to ask for what you are worth. You must be able to cope with
uncertainty and weather the highs and lows of business cycles and manage cash flow. You’ll have to find ways to innovate and showcase yourself as having a better product or service than the competition.  As a business owner, the responsibility for everything is on your shoulders.

Another secret for EAs is establish networks and keep up the ones you have. Don’t burn bridges. Business is about relationships. Whether you remain an EA or start a business, foster relationships, grow your connections. Develop your social skills and the art of
conversation. Broaden your interests.

If you decide you are cut out for the life of a business owner and are willing to put in the hard work, you’ll be rewarded with an immense satisfaction when you accomplish your goals. There’ll be hard days and there’ll be triumphant days. There’ll be days when you ask
yourself “Why am I doing this?” and there’ll be days when you won’t be able to contain yourself from the joy and satisfaction of living your dreams. On those days you’ll know exactly why you are doing this.

FlyPrivate: Is your book, “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” more for
executives, or for their assistants, or perhaps both?

Jan Jones: I can say categorically that the reason I’m able to function successfully in my business is due to my background as an executive assistant for so many years. But I’m also a business owner so I know what a business owner needs from an assistant, and I was able to marry the two in this book. As an assistant I was fortunate to be
exposed to successful entrepreneurs, learning from them, absorbing their habits, learning calculated risk-taking, learning to trust my
instincts, learning that everything that related to the business was my business. I had to know the business inside and out if I was to represent my bosses seamlessly and make important decisions on their behalf. Saying “This is not my job” or saying “No” to my boss would have been unthinkable. Everything was always an
opportunity to learn and showcase my executives in the best
possible light.

When I went into business, I was disappointed to find that some of the famous executives I worked with, had poor-quality assistants. Obviously, these executives did not know what to look for in an
assistant. When they don’t know what to look for, odds are high they won’t know how to effectively utilize a top assistant either. My book evolved out of my desire to not only help executives to hire correctly and work effectively with their assistant, but also to help assistants learn what they need to do to step up their game. If you take time to learn and develop the skills I discuss in my book, they will be there for you as an assistant, or if you venture out on your own. I have great admiration for people who have the courage to start a
business and give themselves a shot at the life they’ve dreamed of. It’s not easy to be a business owner, but there’s tremendous
fulfillment in doing what you love and being able to earn a living from it.


©The CEO’s Secret Weapon. The ideas expressed in this article and any text extracted from “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” are the,
intellectual property and copyrighted to Jan Jones. All rights
reserved. No unauthorized usage or duplication by any means is permitted without the express consent of the author.

Author: Jan Jones

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New
Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received
widespread acclaim from executives and executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed international
executive assistant to well-known business people, including
personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is
passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless, practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ book and visit her website:
The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their
Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

How Much Can I Bring?

How Much Luggage Can I Bring?

We hear this exact question quite often from our clients. Many times our clients have very specific luggage requirements for their trips. They may need space for golf clubs, skis, firearms for a hunting trip, a baby stroller, or any number of things, in addition to their standard luggage requirements. The easiest way to determine which aircraft will suit your individual needs, is to keep in mind that
generally as the jets get larger and have a longer range, they also have more luggage space.

In-flight access to the luggage space depends on the type of aircraft. Some planes have access from within the cabin, some only through the outside of the plane, while others have luggage space and access from both the interior and exterior of the jet.

The number of passengers on the aircraft will also determine how much luggage space will be available. The range of the aircraft
corresponds directly to the jet’s total weight, so it’s very important that the pilot and/or charter company knows exactly what luggage you will be bringing on board.

Aircraft and Luggage Specifications

If you have already determined which aircraft you will flying on or prefer to travel on a specific model of jet, take a look at our Aircraft Specs to get an idea if that jet will suit your needs in terms of
passenger and luggage capacities.

While there are no clear-cut luggage restrictions for private jets,
everything undoubtedly has to fit on the aircraft. Sometimes the runway length can also affect the amount of weight a jet can carry. Work with your aviation provider prior to traveling so you can pack accordingly and choose the best jet option for your trip.

Please call or email our Client Services team so we can provide you with the best flight options and quotes to suit your trip.

Don’t forget to follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Hawker 800XP: A Charter Favorite

Hawker 800XPRaytheon (the maker of the midsize Hawker series)
purchased the midsize jet the BAE 125-800 from British Aerospace (BAE). It was renamed the Hawker 800 after purchase and later with some enhancements, the Hawker 800XP (XP standing for extended performance). Production of the Hawker 800XP was also moved from the United Kingdom to the United States. In 2007, Beechcraft became the new manufacturer of the Hawker 800XP when Raytheon was sold. Today, the midsize jet is manufactured in several places around the United Kingdom, but the jet is tested and
assembled in the United States.

The Hawker 800XP quickly became one of the most popular jets in the midsize class, especially popular among business travelers
because of its spacious cabin and configuration, making it easy to conduct meetings in the sky. The cabin is larger than its competitor the Learjet 60 and longer than the also popular Citation Excel. The Hawker 800XP also comes equipped with a VGA port so
passengers can project presentations and/or movies from their tablets and laptops onto the two VGA monitors.

Hawker 800XP

The Hawker 800XP is a great midsize option for passengers looking for space, comfort and long range performance. It is a preferred
option for trips with 8 passengers or less and compares to the luxury found on super midsize jets.

This jet is impressive for many reasons, but its improved climb and cruise speeds, powerful twin engines, weight limits and ability to take off and land from shorter runways, make it a customer favorite. The Hawker 800XP also comes equipped standard with an airliner style lavatory, a hot and cold galley, comfortable reclining leather seats in a club configuration, retractable tables, and is great for meeting, working, dining and conversation. There is also a three
person divan (small couch) for a passenger to lay down, and a
baggage compartment that can be accessed while in flight.

Hawker 800XP Specifications

For many customers the Hawker 800XP is their preferred method of travel and we are proud to offer this popular aircraft to our
customers at a considerable savings and value.

Please contact us at 800-641-JETS (5387) to reserve a Hawker 800XP for your next trip!

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

FlyPrivate – Private Jet resource for business flights, personal flights and all jet charter in between.

%d bloggers like this: