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Take a Ride on the Global Express Family

Photos courtesy of Bombardier

The Global Express and its derivatives (Global 5000/6000, Global XRS, Global 7000/8000) are Bombardier’s ultra long-range aircraft. The Global 5000 (and Global 6000) is an exceptional heavy jet with unmatched comfort, efficiency and design. According to Bombardier, “Every detail in the Global 5000 aircraft cabin has been carefully designed to bring you the smoothest, most refreshing, and productive experience you can expect from a business jet.”

The Global 5000 can make trans-Atlantic flights with ease, but still excels for trips spanning shorter distances. Able to cruise at
altitudes up to 51,000 feet, this jet can often avoid bad weather by flying above it.

The cabin in the Global 5000/6000 is well appointed for business or pleasure with a spacious “living room” area, a private stateroom with divans for sleeping, a full galley, wide aisles, lots of natural light and full lavatories. The seats in the Global 5000 were designed by for
ultimate comfort and support in the back and headrests.  Some
models even come equipped with an electrically deployed
conference table.

The cabin measures at 2,169 cubic feet of space with 6’2″ in height, 7’11” in width and 40’9″ in length. Some of the technological
amenities
include: a Rockwell Collins Cabin Electronics System (CES), high-speed internet, power outlets, a wireless phone, scanner and fax, a multimedia system with CD/DVD player,  3D maps, 
several touch screen TV monitors, customizable LED lighting, a Honeywell Primus 2000XP avionics suite, advanced soundproofing, a conference table area and more.

The galley of the Global 5000 is also quite impressive and
includes: a microwave and convection oven, coffee/espresso
machine, custom china, chiller, sink and faucet, and space for hot and cold meal prep. Bombardier says, “Access what you require, as
required. With the high-capacity luggage compartment safely
accessible throughout the flight, your personal items are always within reach.” With a comfort-focused cabin and ample baggage space (195 cubic feet), you will have everything you need for the most enjoyable private jet experience.

When it comes to performance, the Global 5000/6000 ranks at the top of the class. This jet has two Rolls-Royce Deutschland BR710A2-20 turbofan engines, allowing it a range of 5984 statue miles and a cruise speed of 560 mph, carrying up to 12-14 passengers
depending on the individual model. “The Global 5000 aircraft
maintains an astonishing range when taking off from wet and short runways. With its powerful engines, oversized carbon brakes and advanced wing design, rainy conditions won’t keep you from getting to your destination.” Bombardier commends the Global 5000/6000 for its operational flexibility, short takeoff range, and ability to
operate with ease in poor weather conditions.

Overall, Bombardier has really hit the mark for personal and
business travelers, no matter what the mission. If you’re in need of a heavy jet, be sure to keep the Global 5000/6000 at the top of your list.

Global 5000 Specifications

Global 6000 Specifications

Global XRS Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: Consequences of Poor Attention to Detail by Executive Assistants

In this article, Author Jan Jones discusses attention to detail as it relates to the Executive Assistant position.

FlyPrivate is a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings
valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do! 

FlyPrivate: Our recent interview on Multitasking produced many
conversations about how the digital world is creating distractions. Not only is productivity decreasing, people are having trouble paying
attention, so the percentage of mistakes is growing. You say in your book that assistants should be “scrupulous about details.” What are the consequences of poor attention to detail by executive assistants?

Jan Jones: “Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it.
Autograph your work with excellence.” – Ted Key, Cartoonist

Attention to detail is a cornerstone of the executive assistant role. It’s what differentiates superior executive assistants from those who are content with average performance and not too particular about the quality of their end product.

I like the saying “Quality is non-negotiable.” Poor quality will destroy your credibility. If you are a freelance virtual assistant, it will destroy your business. Your work is your signature. It says this is the very best I can do. That being the case, we must make delivering a quality product a priority.

Steve Jobs insisted that the Mac should be as beautiful inside as it was on the outside, even though the inside was rarely seen. His wife said “Steve and Jony (Ive) would talk for hours about corners.”
Corners of the iPhone, how they should look, feel and function. If you are familiar with Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle, which uses Apple as the example, this is the “How” Apple does what it does, (“Our products are beautifully designed.”) This fanatical attention to detail is why people line up overnight waiting for the release of a new Apple product. People will pay a premium for products that radiate attention to detail. Owning such a product says something about you and how you wish to be perceived. That’s why people willingly pay for designer labels that exude quality.

I remember a client taking me to lunch at a restaurant with a stellar reputation. When I declined dessert, she insisted I try one of the
signature desserts. After one bite I said to her “now I know why this dessert costs $30.” The attention to detail in the presentation, the precision of execution, the mastery of blending and balancing flavors that leaves your mouth dancing, it was stunning from start to finish. It didn’t just round out the meal, it eclipsed the main meal and turned the lunch into a transcendent experience.

In your role as executive assistant, what’s your version of these
examples? How is your end product demonstrating your attention to detail so that your executive and team members are ecstatic you are on their team, and that they get to work with you every day?  If
assistants truly value their reputation, if they wish to establish their credibility and be taken seriously, then they must make sure to
consistently put out a quality product that exceeds expectations, or at the very least is free of errors and done right the first time. If you have a reputation for being meticulous and paying attention to
detail, small transgressions will be forgiven. If not, it will be one more example of you not being invested in excellence, or caring about how you are perceived. Such a reputation is hard to live down.

No two ways about it, exceptional executive assistants are
scrupulous about the details. They know that sloppy output, typos, poor grammar, avoidable mistakes, don’t only reflect poorly on the
executives they support, it’s a negative reflection on them
personally, and no professional executive assistant wants that
reputation. Forget all that talk about your brand and the image you are trying to project of being a leader and strategic thinker, if you don’t produce work that is thorough and complete. Check your work. Your finished product is your autograph, your reputation, and credibility.

Careless work has real consequences. Close to 80% of recruiters say that typos or bad grammar on a resume are immediate deal
breakers, because they show a lack of attention to detail.

My first boss was an absolute stickler for the details. As an
inexperienced but ambitious secretary, I was itching to jump into big-picture activities, without even knowing what it meant, or what it took to operate at that level. How could I pay attention to the
details when I didn’t even know what those details were? My
inexperience would have caused me to drop the ball, and create problems for my company. Thankfully, with an eagle eye executive looking out for me and smartly capitalizing on my drive to excel, I grew to understand that the big picture is made up of smaller pieces, little details that meticulously build upon each other to create the big picture, just like the big picture comes into view as you build a jigsaw puzzle. As I learned and matured, I understood why I needed to get it right and get it right the first time. Obviously, if you’ve never done something before, it’s possible you won’t get it right the first time. But once you’ve learned how to do the job, pay attention to how you execute because you will be expected to turn in quality work.

I’m sure you’re familiar with the statement “Never time to get it right, but always time to do it over.” There is a cost to business in time and money when we don’t pay attention to the details, when things are missed or wrong, and the work has to be re-done. Do you know that lack of attention to details impacts employee morale? It frustrates your colleagues. These are the people upline and
downline who are relying on the job you do – you are that vital
component that allows them to complete their project on time and on budget. If you make mistakes it decreases productivity, wastes their time, and could result in delays that cause your company to
upset their customers, or even lose them. Worst case, there could be legal or compliance ramifications from inaccurate work.

In one fell swoop, your credibility is lost if your work is sloppy, or brands you as functionally illiterate. An assistant colleague asked my opinion on a survey soliciting input from EAs. The survey questions had some unsubstantiated assumptions and the EA didn’t want a
repeat of that infamous Wall Street Journal article from earlier this year. I sent a private message to the woman with the survey, asking a few questions and entreating her to be careful how she positioned the role of the EA because the last thing we need is another
magazine circulating misconceptions about the role. Here’s the
response I got from her:

“If any of the EA’s that you reference to are at the level to support my research then they would of all ready knew me and what work I have been doing while in Silicon Valley supporting my CEO to now being a business owner.” 

Can you imagine the shock people might get when they receive
correspondence from her? I’m always driving home to EAs that you are your executive’s face and voice to the world. What image is this woman projecting on behalf of her executive? She assisted a top
executive in Silicon Valley, where, we hear, they are demanding EAs have degrees. Yet, there exists a top executive there whose assistant seems barely literate in her native language. Not exactly modeling Steve Jobs’ passion for “how” we do things.

One group of assistants proudly displayed a newspaper
article that said they were a team of rock star assistants. The
problem is the article had a glaring typo in the big headline, which none of those EAs addressed, so instead of being celebrated, they were being ridiculed. Even if one of them had offered some
explanation (most likely the newspaper was at fault), things could have been different for them. Assistants, you have to get out ahead of things and head them off, or quickly set them straight with an
explanation. Leaving things to languish and hoping they go away is not a good strategy in protecting your reputation for being
scrupulous about the details.

Another area where assistants must pay more attention to detail is on social media. It’s a low-key environment, but that doesn’t mean you lower your standards. Recently, there have been postings where people meant to say “a part of”, as in they are happy to be a part of a group. They wrote it as “apart”, which means separate from. One memo we received said the caterer’s signature tamales are
“Handmaid daily.” These are examples of easily avoided carelessness. Pay attention and don’t let hasty work tarnish your reputation for reliability.

Proofreading, especially lengthy pieces, is not easy. That’s why it calls for your special attention. Read your work, then set it aside. Come back to it with fresh eyes. If possible, run it by someone else to get another set of eyes on it. If my bosses prepared their own
documents, they always gave them to me to read before sending out. If they were lengthy or complicated, I printed them out to proofread. Studies show, and for me personally, I know that reading on paper is more effective in detecting errors that get missed onscreen, not to mention being easier on tired eyes. Another tip is to read your work out aloud to yourself. Sometimes what we intend to say, and what we actually write, are not the same. Reading aloud lets you discover the errors more easily.

Do you know that a key factor of CEO success is their attention to detail? Stanford economics professor Nicholas Bloom says “CEOs are unbelievably detail-oriented. That’s one of the big ingredients of their success.” This is an executive success habit that assistants must absolutely mirror. Bloom says that when he teaches students, they get “over excited about the big-picture, sexy stuff of long-term
strategy and skip over the small details which turn out to be
critically important in business.” This is something I learned at the start of my assistant career, and can’t emphasize enough, especially to younger assistants today. If you can’t perform well in the small things, you won’t do well with the bigger critical tasks, and no
serious executive is going to take that risk. Would you if you were in their shoes? You have to practice excellence and demonstrate it
daily before you’ll be given entrée to inner circles, or invited to take that seat at the table you may feel entitled to. As UCLA basketball coach John Wooden said, “Little things make big things happen.”

If you’d like to brush up on making big things happen through your attention to detail, here are some suggestions:

  • To produce error-free work start by focusing on what you are
    doing. Slow down and give yourself time to think. When you rush, the finer points get missed.
  • Prioritize your workload so you don’t forget about a
    time-sensitive project and then rush to complete it.
  • Keep distractions to a minimum, especially if you are doing work that requires high levels of concentration.
  • Make sure you are clear about expectations. How much time do you have to complete the job? What are the deadlines? Is the
    entire project due at one time, or are there milestones you need to meet?
  • Analyze and understand what’s in front of you. Ask if you don’t understand so you don’t waste time re-doing things.
  • Plan your work. What’s the end result you need to produce and how will you go about it? It’s helpful to understand how your task fits into the broader picture with your team, or company. When you view it from that perspective, you get a better understanding, the details become clearer and you can make sure not to miss them.
  • Certain jobs that you do on a regular basis might benefit from a checklist that you can use to make sure no details are overlooked. For smaller or easier jobs, I would sketch out in my mind what needed to be done. But for bigger projects, I created a detailed checklist and crossed off each item or segment as it was completed.
  • A big project with many elements can be intimidating, so break the job down into manageable segments that will make it easier for you to review and catch any omissions or errors.
  • Remember, get the right things done and get them done right the first time. Check and re-check your work. If possible, get a second set of eyes on a project that is more involved.
  • Have confidence in yourself and your ability to get the job done.
  • Be passionate and proud of what you do. The way you present yourself matters. In the words of the poet, Kahlil Gibran, “Work is love made visible.”

©The CEO’s Secret Weapon. The ideas expressed in this article and any text extracted from “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” are the
intellectual property and copyrighted to Jan Jones. All rights
reserved. No unauthorized usage or duplication by any means is permitted without the express consent of the author.

Author: Jan Jones

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New
Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received
widespread acclaim from executives and executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed international
executive assistant to well-known business people, including
personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is
passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless, practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ book and visit her website:
The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their
Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Giving Thanks

There is no better time than now to express how grateful we are for our clients. Even with all the difficulties 2020 has presented us with, there is still so much to be thankful for this Thanksgiving. We are so thankful for you and your continued business. 

We may have told you this before, but without you, we don’t have a business. You are the reason we have the company we do. You are the reason we are passionate about private aviation. It’s because of you that we enjoy our work every day. 

And, because of that, we are determined to:

– Make every trip with FlyPrivate an superior experience
Exceed your expectations
– Provide you with unmatched service and pricing

Thank you for supporting our business through the trials of this year. We appreciate your business this and every year! We are grateful for your loyalty and wish you a healthy and Happy Thanksgiving!

If we can provide you with a flight quote for your next trip, please contact us.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Featuring the First-Class Falcon 900

The Dassault Falcon 900 is a heavy jet designed as a larger,
enhanced version of the Falcon 50 super midsize jet. The Falcon 900 received FAA certification in 1986, and while it does share a similar configuration to the Falcon 50, it has a larger range, can seat more passengers and has a longer and wider fuselage. The longer fuselage allows the interior to be more spacious and comfortable, while also providing passengers a bit of separation from the crew.

Falcon 900

The Falcon 900s‘ design incorporates composite materials wherever possible, drastically reducing the weight of the aircraft. The flight range is impressive, able to travel 4,600 statute miles because of the innovative three-engine configuration. The third engine is ideal for international flights and also offers flight planning and safety benefits. The Falcon 900 can seat up to 12 passengers and travels at average speeds up to 536 mph. The Falcon 900 jets share virtually the same wing design as the Falcon 50.

In 1994, Dassault introduced the Falcon 900EX, a longer range
version of the Falcon 900 with increased fuel capacity. The Falcon 900EX features a Honeywell Primus 2000 avionics package, engine upgrades that provide the aircraft with additional thrust, and a Head-Up Display for the pilot.

Falcon 900

The Falcon 900s offer a spacious cabin with some seats that can be reclined into a full-length bed perfect for a mid-flight nap. All of the additional seats are also fully adjustable, able to swivel and recline.  This jet also has a private lavatory, as well as an isolated galley and cockpit. The Falcon 900 offers 127 cubic feet of internal baggage space that can be accessed during your flight.

Few other jets in its class can compete with the Falcon 900 in terms of passenger comfort, range and performance.

To request a Falcon 900 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with a flight quote.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: Can Executive Assistants be effective working remotely?

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received widespread acclaim from executives and
executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed
international executive assistant to well-known business people,
including personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless,
practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.


For the past three years, FlyPrivate has been a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do!

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series: Part 1-10!

FlyPrivateCan executive assistants be effective if they are working remotely?  What about virtual assistants? Can executives have their business needs met by using remote or virtual assistants?

Jan Jones: As the old saying goes, “there’s horses for courses”.
Meaning depending on the circumstances or conditions, assistants can be effective working remotely and many executives can have their business needs met by using remotely-located or virtual
assistants. We should take a closer look at the circumstances under which executives could function effectively using assistants who are working remotely, or are virtual assistants, to determine how
effective they can be.

Let’s take working remotely first. Actually, this is not something new. I was recently speaking with a former CEO of an international fast food organization. He told me that in the 1980s, within a few months of each other, several of his company’s assistants became pregnant, or wanted to leave due to their childcare situations. Since they had been with the company a long time and he didn’t want to lose their years of experience, he set them up with computers in their homes. He told them, “I don’t care when or how you work, just get the work done and deliver it on time.”  Technology today makes computers affordable and the internet gives us immense freedom to work from just about anywhere we choose, so it makes sense that remote and virtual assistants are gaining in popularity.

But how suitable is it for an executive who needs a certain level of support from an assistant? I checked in with two of the best, most celebrated executive assistants I know: Penni Pike former assistant to Sir Richard Branson for 31 years and Debbie Gross who spent over 25 years as assistant to John Chambers, former CEO and
current Executive Chairman of Cisco Systems. Both ladies are
featured in my book “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”.

Penni told me “Richard included me in everything”, which is how she came to know and understand the Virgin business and what
mattered most to her boss. When I asked her about assistants
working remotely she said, “I can’t understand that because I always worked so closely with Richard. He needed his assistant by his side. People at the very top have to have someone who works with them like that. Otherwise, if they need something urgently, the assistant is not there. Richard needs someone with him all the time.”

Debbie Gross said, “For administrative professionals, working
remotely has become more of the ‘norm’ in today’s business world partly due to the change in business models.  Many administrators support teams that are based around the world and are never
actually in a traditional office.  With the advance in video
technologies, it has definitely become easier to work remotely.

“That being said, one of the key roles I believe an administrator plays is their ability to build relationships across all levels and be the eyes and ears for the people they support.  Harder to do effectively from a ‘home-office’ environment. This was a critical component of my role supporting a CEO making working remotely not really an
option. John always expected me to be the ‘face’ of the office
especially when he traveled.  When he would check in while on the road he always asked how things were going at the office, so I felt it was key that I be present there. It was about noticing what was
going on around me with other members of the organization and
being able to feel the pulse and morale and share that with John.  He was pretty adamant that executive assistants be in the office, so I am not sure I would have been hired to support him if one of my
requirements was to work from home. Many senior level executives prefer to have their executive assistants in the office, especially the higher they are in their organizations.”

This has also been my experience in my career as an executive
assistant. My jobs were much too interactive with my boss, staff, clients and vendors for me to be outside the office. Like Debbie Gross, my executives counted on me to be their ‘eyes and ears’ and their ‘face’ to the world. Situations were constantly arising that needed my immediate attention. Leaving my desk to go pick up a sandwich at lunchtime could prove tricky. When I worked for bosses who were constantly traveling, on the rare days they were
scheduled to be in the office, I brought my lunch to work so I would not have to be away from my desk for more than a few minutes. Meetings were being set up, canceled or moved at a moment’s
notice, people would drop by unannounced, phone calls were being made, sometimes I was holding 2 or 3 calls at the same time, project approvals were needed, documents required signature, and there were always more travel arrangements to be made, changed or
canceled. Most executives I worked for were constantly calling out for me and I tried to always be within earshot, or have my assistant or someone listen out and let me know if I was being yelled for.  How would I have managed all this remotely?

I am currently working on a project with an assistant who is located remotely and I find it arduous. Work that should take 2 days is taking 5 or 6 due to the back and forth across international time zones. Yet, I am constantly meeting assistants who say they’ve negotiated with their executives to work remotely. Perhaps these executives have become accustomed to doing many tasks their assistants should be doing, or much of the work their assistants do for them is not of an urgent or time-sensitive nature.  Their assistants probably aren’t functioning as their liaison or deputy as I did, or as Gross and Pike did for their executives.

A big negative with the arrangement of assistants working remotely is the burden it places on assistants who are working at the office. I hear complaints that the remote assistants show themselves as “available”, but when they are contacted they don’t respond for hours, sometimes even an entire day goes by when they are not
responding to emails, texts or phone calls.  The urgency arises to schedule or re-schedule meetings, for example, but the assistant can’t be reached. If the executive is traveling, neither the executive nor their assistant can be reached and too much time is being spent by other assistants trying to contact them, cover for them, or
wasting time putting their own tasks on hold waiting for a response. I’ve inquired why these assistants don’t insist HR or the remote
assistant’s boss does something about it. HR tells them the boss agreed the assistant could work remotely when they hired them, so there’s nothing they can do. This is a cop-out by HR and the
executive. They must step up and consider the overall effects this situation has on the company. If this arrangement were impeding my workplace productivity, I would actively agitate for it to be changed. I would lobby HR not to allow executives to agree to letting their
assistants work remotely, but instead offer it as an option with
certain conditions, mainly that the assistant proves they are mature and responsible enough to warrant that privilege.

The bigger concern I have for assistants working remotely is how do they learn the business? How do they grow and expand in the role if they are not there to witness the daily ins and outs of the business environment? How do they develop a relationship of trust and
familiarity with their executive if they are not in physical proximity to each other? Ultimately, are they setting themselves up to become redundant? With warnings about A.I. and virtual assistants stepping in to fill many of the routine tasks assistants do, I would pay close
attention to developing skills and processes that make me more valuable and available to my executive.

The exception to this is assistants who have been with their
executive a long time, have built up a strong relationship with an
understanding of the business and each other. If the business is in a mature phase, or the executive’s role is such that they can be gone for periods of time, their assistants have the freedom to work remotely.

Penni mentioned that she thought assistants working remotely might get lonely. Debbie also addressed this from her experience at Cisco. “3 years ago I came to recognize that at Cisco, there was a whole administrative community that worked remotely and in
talking with several of these administrative professionals it became clear that they all felt a sense of isolation from the broader
administrative community.  As a result we pulled together this group and created an initiative known as G.R.A.C.E. – Global Remote
Administrators Connecting Effectively.  This is a group of remote
administrators who come together once a quarter to discuss the challenges they are facing, as well as review of best practices that help them feel connected.

“One of the key areas discussed was the challenge of developing a relationship with the leader because they were remote.  I strongly encourage administrative professionals who are working remotely to make it a point to travel to the corporate office at least once a year and even better, quarterly if they can, in order to ‘connect’ with their peers, meet the people they interface with across the
organization and become ‘visible’ – putting a face to the voice.  I also always suggest that remote administrators attend networking events and administrative conferences to learn and engage with
others in their profession. Working remotely certainly has its
advantages. However, administrative professionals can be even more effective by not isolating themselves. I feel that it is in our
administrative DNA that we connect with others and build strong relationships and that means we have to get out of ‘home-office’
environment to do that.  Many of Cisco’s G.R.A.C.E. members are now coming to the corporate office and networking with their peers, enriching their relationships and friendships and growing their knowledge and ultimately being of greater assistance to the leaders they support.”

Virtual Assistants: I often meet assistants who tell me they are
toying with the idea of trying out being a VA because they perceive it as a freeing experience. The purpose of including information about the VA profession in this article is to help assistants understand what it takes to survive and thrive as a VA.

Thanks to technology, there is a role for virtual assistants in the
business world. I remember from the pre-internet days, a friend of mine who worked at a large university would earn extra money
using her home computer to type students’ assignments, or
professors’ presentations. It stands to reason then, that with the freedom the internet offers us, that the virtual assistant profession would flourish.  Originally, this was a service that many
single-operator or small businesses used, but it is becoming more common for established businesses with ample resources to seek out the services of virtual assistants.

Penni Pike is an advisor for Time, etc., the virtual assistant service started in the UK, but now successfully established in the USA as well. Penni was brought on board by the company’s founder,
Barnaby Lashbrooke to guide them in setting up the business. He said Penni provided invaluable insight into how the EA-Executive
relationship should work and what kind of support executives need. Assistants chosen to work for Time, etc., go through a thorough
vetting process, not only for administrative skills, but for
inter-personal skills such as a client-focused viewpoint,
responsiveness to clients requests, attention to detail and so on. Their VAs are a mix of mid-to-high level, offering a range of skills that are “not all admin based, but include the strategic management side of business as well” said Barnaby.

He says the VA role is not suited for everyone. Many assistants are better suited to working in an office, so Time, etc., probes the prospective assistant’s reasons for wanting to be a VA. This is an
important aspect of the vetting process because it would be
disruptive if clients like working with a particular assistant and
develop an effective working relationship, only to find out the
assistant has moved on. Quality assistants with young families who need the flexibility of working from home, yet still need to bring in an income, are the most typical profile of a VA.

Anita Armas of Anita D. Armas Administrative Services from West Covina in California told me she started her VA business because she needed freedom and flexibility when she was looking for a way to be at home with her young children while still earning an income. Anita said, “I knew there was a way to use my skills and experience to do just that but wasn’t sure how, then I heard about virtual
assistants. My husband’s business was hit hard by the financial crisis of 2008 and I needed another way to bring in additional income, so I officially began marketing myself as a virtual assistant and I soon gained my first client.”

I asked Anita what mindset a person needs to be successful as a VA. “Aside from skills, in order to be successful as a virtual assistant one must be confident, resourceful, thick-skinned, adaptable, a great communicator and have a servant’s heart. As a VA business owner, my business success depends greatly on the success of my clients. A successful VA will not just be a “doer” but will be innovative and strategically invested in his or her clients business, in order to know how to best support their client. A willingness to learn and grow are key,” says Anita. She added that some of the pitfalls a VA can
experience include the client not seeing the VA as an autonomous business owner and leaning towards an employer/employee
mentality. The client feeling a sense of exclusivity, thinking they are the only client the VA has, and lack of communication between the VA and the client.

When assistants tell me they are considering becoming a VA, I
caution them that before they leave a secure, well-paying job with benefits and career advancement opportunities, they should
consider how the uncertainty of not immediately having a steady
income might impact them. They should consider whether or not they are cut out for working alone and whether they are sufficiently disciplined to get down to work every day when they have the
option to work at their own time and pace. It’s easy to romanticize being your own boss when you are operating from the safety of a
secure job. The reality of being self employed can be a wakeup call when you have to prospect for business, deal with unhappy clients, pay bills, collect payments and furnish your own healthcare. Many VAs thrive in the role and others, after a mild flirtation with
independence, gladly return to the security of a full time job.
Evaluate your skills, your disposition and your self-discipline
thoroughly before you venture into the VA world. It is not for
everyone, particularly if you decide not to work through a platform such as Time, etc., preferring to source business on your own.

What’s exciting about all this is the many options assistants of all
calibers and experience levels have at their disposal today.  When you get excited about the opportunities, be sure to think through the potential downsides, not just the upsides. Use this article to make a Pros and Cons list for yourself. I wish you success in whatever you decide.

Author: Jan Jones

©Copyright Jan Jones, 2015 “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ new book and visit her website: The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones


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Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Holiday Travel Tips – Busiest Days to Fly

When planning your holiday travel for the months of November,
December and January, there are a few crucial dates to keep in mind.

The most popular holiday travel dates (indicated on the calendar above) are expected to be:

– November: 19th – 30th & December 1st

– December: 17th – 31st

– January: 1st – 6th

  • Due to the increased demand for private flights, the system can be strained. Aircraft, FBOs, pilots, flight crews, caterers, and ground transportation all are affected and planning ahead
    becomes essential. Because of the increased demand for private jets around the holidays, prices can jump. Booking earlier ensures you get the jet you want at the best price.
  • Weather can also play a critical role in how many flights are
    available during this time of year.
  • The majority of people chartering private jets are flying in the same direction during the holiday season. Generally, we see an
    increase in traffic heading north to south, but some the most
    popular destinations are Florida, Colorado, the Caribbean and New York.

So what does this mean for you? If you are planning to travel in the next few months, we highly recommend that you book your flights promptly to ensure the best options, pricing and aircraft are
available for your trip.

Don’t forget to follow us on our social media channels for the latest FlyPrivate news and information.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Understanding Jet Classes and What Each Offers

If you are looking for the right jet aircraft for your next trip, whether for business or pleasure, it is important to understand what class of jet will best suit your needs. Jet industry professionals group jet
aircraft into 6 classes consisting of: Heavy Jets, Super Midsize Jets, Midsize Jets, Light Jets, Very Light Jets, and Turboprops. Let’s
discuss the benefits of each class of jet to help you make the most
informed decision.

Heavy Jets

Heavy jets are appropriate when your party numbers fourteen (14) or fewer. Heavy Jets have the most luxurious onboard
accommodations, always including a galley and enclosed lavatory. These jets are generally the most comfortable for long-range trips and can include internet access, audio and video players, satellite phones and a range of other amenities. Additionally, the crew will usually include a cabin attendant.

Super Midsize Jets

Super Midsize jets are appropriate when you seek more range than a standard midsize but may not have the need for a heavy jet. Super Midsize jets will typically avoid a fuel stop on flights less than 2,500. Often Super Midsize jets are the fastest and most fuel efficient of the jet classes. These jets also include a wide variety of amenities similar to that of the heavy jets.

Hawker 800XP

Midsize Jets

Midsize jets are appropriate for parties of seven (7) or fewer and will typically avoid a fuel stop on flights less than 2,500 miles. The
Midsize jets are the most versatile in that they offer better fuel economy than the larger jet classes, but still offer many of the same amenities. Midsize jets are equipped with an enclosed lavatory.

Light Jets

Light jets are appropriate for parties of five (5) or fewer and will
typically avoid a fuel stop on flights less than 1,500 miles. Light jets are economical, have a quiet engine, and are a great option for short to mid-range flights. Because of their smaller size, light jets can land at smaller FBOs and airports to help get you closer to your
destination and often fly at higher altitudes. Luggage capacity is
limited.

Very Light Jets

Very Light Jets (VLJs) are small light aircraft that typically hold a small group of 4 or 5 passengers comfortably. The very light jets are a fairly new category of aircraft, and thus are equipped with the very latest in jet engine technology which delivers the speed, quality, and fuel efficiency that allow for a more cost effective means of private jet travel.

  • Average Range: 1,000-1,500 miles
  • Average Cruising Speed: 400 mph
  • Passenger Count: 4-6 seats
  • Average Baggage Capacity: 47 cubic feet
  • FlyPrivate Round Trip Hourly Rates: $1,500-$2,000
  • FlyPrivate One Way Trip Hourly Rates: Quoted per trip
  • Examples of Popular Very Light Jets: Phenom 100,
    Citation Mustang and the Eclipse 550

Turboprops

Turboprops are a great solution for trips less than 500 miles and for trips into airports with shorter runways. Seating varies by aircraft model from 4-8 passengers. Turboprops provide better performance on shorter runways, many models have larger cabins than Light jets. Some Turboprops have enclosed lavatories while others do not have any lavatory facilities.

Ask our experts which jet class they suggest for your next trip and we will be happy to provide you with a recommendation and free flight quote.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: What Makes Assistants Successful at Multitasking?

In this article, Author Jan Jones discusses multitasking as it relates to the Executive Assistant position.

FlyPrivate is a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings
valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do! 

FlyPrivate: We’ve been hearing that “multitasking” is a myth and we should stop trying to do multiple things at once. But I recall you saying that being good at multitasking was vital to your success as an
executive assistant. Can you clarify? 

Jan Jones: Yes, I did say that and I fully believe that multitasking – as it pertains to the role of the executive assistant – is a fine art that many executive assistants have perfected. But I should make the
distinction about what I mean regarding “multitasking” as it pertains to the executive assistant, as opposed to executives and others.

We now have scientific evidence that multitasking is impossible for our brains and that, in fact, when we think we are multitasking what’s happening is that our brains are almost instantaneously switching back and forth from one task to another. It happens so fast that we think we are doing more than one thing at a time. This is easy to prove. Try giving your full attention to reading an email at the same time you are trying to pay complete attention to a phone call you are having. You will soon become aware that both tasks are suffering and you have to stop doing one of them.

So when I say that being good at multitasking was vital to my success as an EA, it comes down to that ability to switch back and forth
between tasks at a remarkably rapid pace, and then quickly
regaining laser focus. It takes discipline and practice and is not something everyone can do effectively. But for me, and some
assistants I’ve observed, it seems to be less arduous. My opinion is that because of the demands of the EA role, assistants are
constantly multitasking and as a result have mastered the ability to switch from task to task very quickly, along with the ability to regain focus. Obviously, some are better at it than others. The key is not to multitask with projects that require 100% of your concentration. That will result in you making mistakes, doing the job poorly and
taking longer to do it. It helps to batch similar tasks so that it’s easier to switch back and forth, but realistically, EAs don’t always have that option when requests are piling up, so you end up devising your own system and style of working in order to get it all handled.

I think another part to the talent of multitasking as demonstrated by assistants is revealed in an article published in Scientific American in April 2010. The article says that the brain can keep tabs on two tasks at once, even though we can’t actually do two tasks at once. I think this ability to keep tabs on two tasks at once is crucial to EAs being successful in their job. I liken it to sleeping with one eye open. You’ve always got your eye on all those balls you are juggling, to make sure nothing gets dropped. Nothing escapes your attention. This is a
desirable talent and one that is highly developed in goal-oriented executive assistants.

The world of the EA is one of constant interruptions, and if you
support more than one executive, that’s even more applicable to you. But that’s the nature of our job. We don’t have the luxury of
taking ourselves off to some quiet corner where we can focus on one thing at a time, as the experts are constantly advising executives to do. Assistants have to operate in the thick of it all day and everyday, so we must get better and better at recovering our focus as our brains rapidly switch back and forth between tasks. I don’t know of any scientific evidence to back up my assertion, but I know from
personal experience that I’m quickly able to adjust back and forth. I’m sure other assistants have this capability as well, and I’d be
interested to hear from them about it.

Multitasking can be tiring and one clue to help reduce the stress it causes is to give your brain a re-set if you’ve been doing a lot of
multitasking. Take a break, or focus on one task only. I know this sounds like wishful thinking to assistants, particularly with the
current Covid lockdown, which is forcing assistants to multitask business and homelife demands. So you must allow your brain even a brief rest. Reduced stress allows your immune system to function better. I was just reading a conversation between a medical working group that includes surgeons and neuroscientists. This comment caught my eye. “Threats fire up the immune system. ‘Threats’ are all sorts of stuff. Viruses, bacteria, a bully, a difficult boss, your thoughts and repressed emotions. Thoughts and emotions are processed in the brain the same way as a physical threat. Anxiety also fires up the immune system.” So, please take a break and calm your nervous system.

Another clue to successful multitasking is to have a priority list. It will help you to meet your objectives. Sometimes, the most
important task may require the highest amount of concentration and time for completion. Knowing this, you can quickly knock off a bunch of lesser items that don’t require a lot of time or
concentration, and then get down to uninterrupted time with your key projects. With those lesser items completed, you’ve probably satisfied some of your stakeholders, and you won’t be anxious about all those other things you have left to do, while you are trying to
focus on the complex, big-ticket items.

It’s true, science has shown you lose time when you multitask. Time is lost as your brain switches back and forth between tasks. (Studies say as much as 40% in some cases). But you can learn to make up for those precious lost seconds by quickly regaining your focus. The ability to focus and not give way to needless distractions is a skill
assistants must develop, especially during these times where smart phones and social media platforms are purposely designed to
distract us by keeping us addicted to checking them constantly.

This is not a joke. Some brave souls in the technology arena are
finally speaking up about the way devices are programmed in order to addict us. We need to be vigilant about this so our devices don’t rule our lives in a negative way, destroying our ability to focus and putting us into overwhelm and overload.

EAs may wish to view the 60 Minutes piece on “Brain Hacking” where former Google product manager, Tristan Harris (also in the Netflix film “The Social Dilemma”) discusses how Silicon Valley
exploits neuroscience to keep us addicted to technology.
Ex-Facebook president Sean Parker says Facebook is designed to exploit human vulnerability, by creating things like the “like” button, which give users “a little dopamine hit” so they continue to upload content. These revelations are an eye opener and should give pause to every assistant to examine if they are using technology, or if
technology is using them. I repeatedly say to assistants that
technology is a tool to help you get better at what you do. It can’t be a substitute for the human skills the job requires. In this case the skill is focus which technology is inadequate for, because it
constantly distracts your focus and robs you of time. However, don’t overlook that technology may provide a solution if you are able to automate some of those repetitive tasks that slow your productivity.

Multitasking, even as we understand it scientifically today, will
continue to be an essential component in the arsenal of exceptional executive assistants. It’s not feasible for assistants to stop
multitasking, so get really good at it. Develop your ability to switch back and forth rapidly between tasks and quickly regain your focus. The benefits of learning to focus go far beyond multitasking. It
dramatically increases your productivity and the quality of your work. The partnership of focus with multitasking is a paramount skill for time-pressured assistants. Once you master this combined skill, you won’t resent interruptions because your remarkable ability to focus will help you to quickly get back on target again. And this
ability is why I say, despite the science, many executive assistants have multitasking down to a fine art.


©The CEO’s Secret Weapon. The ideas expressed in this article and any text extracted from “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” are the,
intellectual property and copyrighted to Jan Jones. All rights
reserved. No unauthorized usage or duplication by any means is permitted without the express consent of the author.

Author: Jan Jones

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New
Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received
widespread acclaim from executives and executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed international
executive assistant to well-known business people, including
personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is
passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless, practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ book and visit her website:
The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their
Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

The Challenger 850: Unrivaled Cabin Comforts

The Bombardier Challenger 850 was first certified in 2006 (as an upgrade to the Challenger 800) and is still in production today. This jet is unique because it was derived from the CRJ200 airliner and shares the same airframe and dual CE CF34-3B1 turbofan engines. The Challenger 850 can carry large loads over transcontinental
distances (i.e. New York to Los Angeles), making it a versatile heavy jet option for personal and business travelers alike. 

The spacious cabin is the same as the Global 6000, with a shorter range, often offering substantial cost savings. The Challenger 850’s cabin can be configured 3 ways to meet unique business
requirements and is laid out in 3 zones. It offers a well-equipped
galley and a full-sized, private deluxe lavatory for passengers, with an additional forward lavatory for the crew. The noise-reduction technology makes for a peaceful trip, while the addition of an audio/video system, internet access and satellite phone, make
conducting business in the air a breeze.

The Challenger 850’s cabin is very spacious with 6’1″ of standing height and measures over 7’2″ in width and 48’4″ in length. With 30% more cabin space than its closest competitor, this aircraft will
accommodate 12-15 passengers comfortably, as well as 2 crew members and a flight attendant. The Challenger 850 also has a
generous baggage compartment providing 115 cubic feet of internal
baggage space that is accessible during flight.

The Challenger 850 has a range of around 3,230 statute miles with 12 passengers on board, and flies at an average speed of 528 mph. The cockpit is equipped with a Rockwell Collins Pro Line 4 avionics system, an all-glass cockpit, dual digital radios, color weather radar and six display screens, offering the highest level of jet charter safety.  

The Challenger 850 offers the best combination of size, comfort and value and is a favorite of corporate and leisure passengers alike.

To request a Challenger 850 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be pleased to provide you with a flight quote for your next trip.

Challenger 850 Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Meet the Citation Sovereign

Citation Sovereign Exterior

In 2002, the Cessna Citation Sovereign took its first flight. Created to bridge the gap between the Citation Excel/XLS and the Citation X, the Sovereign falls in the Super Midsize Jet class and offers many impressive features.

The Citation Sovereign was designed to offer exceptional overall performance, while also providing unrivaled comfort and amenities for passengers. The Sovereign’s spacious interior is over 24 feet long and offers many amenities typical of a Heavy Jet, such as a full size refreshment center, several entertainment options and a full size lavatory. It can seat up to 8 passengers comfortably and the cabin height is tall enough at 5′ 8″ that most people can stand up. The
baggage space in the Citation Sovereign is unmatched compared to other Super Midsize Jets with 135 cubic feet of baggage space.

The Citation Sovereign has a truly impressive range with its coast-to-coast capabilities. The long range makes the Sovereign a
customer favorite because it compares to a Heavy Jet, but is more economical as far as fuel economy. It performs exceptionally well at high elevations and is very capable of take-off and landing from shorter runways.

Citation Sovereigns are also a favorite of pilots because of its many automatic features and easy handling.  With an improved wing
design that drastically improves airflow and lift capabilities, the
Sovereign is able to cruise  at speeds of 514 mph.  It is equipped with Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306C turbofan engines that are flat-rates to minimize noise pollution, and provide 5,600 lbs of thrust during takeoff. From the landing gear to the brake system and unique variable gearing mechanism that adjusts the jet’s flaps to optimal angles during flight, the Citation Sovereign is hard to beat in overall performance, comfort, versatility, and range.

Citation Sovereign Exterior

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on: 

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.