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Featuring the First-Class Falcon 900

The Dassault Falcon 900 is a heavy jet designed as a larger,
enhanced version of the Falcon 50 super midsize jet. The Falcon 900 received FAA certification in 1986, and while it does share a similar configuration to the Falcon 50, it has a larger range, can seat more passengers and has a longer and wider fuselage. The longer fuselage allows the interior to be more spacious and comfortable, while also providing passengers a bit of separation from the crew.

Falcon 900

The Falcon 900s‘ design incorporates composite materials wherever possible, drastically reducing the weight of the aircraft. The flight range is impressive, able to travel 4,600 statute miles because of the innovative three-engine configuration. The third engine is ideal for international flights and also offers flight planning and safety benefits. The Falcon 900 can seat up to 12 passengers and travels at average speeds up to 536 mph. The Falcon 900 jets share virtually the same wing design as the Falcon 50.

In 1994, Dassault introduced the Falcon 900EX, a longer range
version of the Falcon 900 with increased fuel capacity. The Falcon 900EX features a Honeywell Primus 2000 avionics package, engine upgrades that provide the aircraft with additional thrust, and a Head-Up Display for the pilot.

Falcon 900

The Falcon 900s offer a spacious cabin with some seats that can be reclined into a full-length bed perfect for a mid-flight nap. All of the additional seats are also fully adjustable, able to swivel and recline.  This jet also has a private lavatory, as well as an isolated galley and cockpit. The Falcon 900 offers 127 cubic feet of internal baggage space that can be accessed during your flight.

Few other jets in its class can compete with the Falcon 900 in terms of passenger comfort, range and performance.

To request a Falcon 900 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with a flight quote.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: Can Executive Assistants be effective working remotely?

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received widespread acclaim from executives and
executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed
international executive assistant to well-known business people,
including personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless,
practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.


For the past three years, FlyPrivate has been a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do!

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series: Part 1-10!

FlyPrivateCan executive assistants be effective if they are working remotely?  What about virtual assistants? Can executives have their business needs met by using remote or virtual assistants?

Jan Jones: As the old saying goes, “there’s horses for courses”.
Meaning depending on the circumstances or conditions, assistants can be effective working remotely and many executives can have their business needs met by using remotely-located or virtual
assistants. We should take a closer look at the circumstances under which executives could function effectively using assistants who are working remotely, or are virtual assistants, to determine how
effective they can be.

Let’s take working remotely first. Actually, this is not something new. I was recently speaking with a former CEO of an international fast food organization. He told me that in the 1980s, within a few months of each other, several of his company’s assistants became pregnant, or wanted to leave due to their childcare situations. Since they had been with the company a long time and he didn’t want to lose their years of experience, he set them up with computers in their homes. He told them, “I don’t care when or how you work, just get the work done and deliver it on time.”  Technology today makes computers affordable and the internet gives us immense freedom to work from just about anywhere we choose, so it makes sense that remote and virtual assistants are gaining in popularity.

But how suitable is it for an executive who needs a certain level of support from an assistant? I checked in with two of the best, most celebrated executive assistants I know: Penni Pike former assistant to Sir Richard Branson for 31 years and Debbie Gross who spent over 25 years as assistant to John Chambers, former CEO and
current Executive Chairman of Cisco Systems. Both ladies are
featured in my book “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”.

Penni told me “Richard included me in everything”, which is how she came to know and understand the Virgin business and what
mattered most to her boss. When I asked her about assistants
working remotely she said, “I can’t understand that because I always worked so closely with Richard. He needed his assistant by his side. People at the very top have to have someone who works with them like that. Otherwise, if they need something urgently, the assistant is not there. Richard needs someone with him all the time.”

Debbie Gross said, “For administrative professionals, working
remotely has become more of the ‘norm’ in today’s business world partly due to the change in business models.  Many administrators support teams that are based around the world and are never
actually in a traditional office.  With the advance in video
technologies, it has definitely become easier to work remotely.

“That being said, one of the key roles I believe an administrator plays is their ability to build relationships across all levels and be the eyes and ears for the people they support.  Harder to do effectively from a ‘home-office’ environment. This was a critical component of my role supporting a CEO making working remotely not really an
option. John always expected me to be the ‘face’ of the office
especially when he traveled.  When he would check in while on the road he always asked how things were going at the office, so I felt it was key that I be present there. It was about noticing what was
going on around me with other members of the organization and
being able to feel the pulse and morale and share that with John.  He was pretty adamant that executive assistants be in the office, so I am not sure I would have been hired to support him if one of my
requirements was to work from home. Many senior level executives prefer to have their executive assistants in the office, especially the higher they are in their organizations.”

This has also been my experience in my career as an executive
assistant. My jobs were much too interactive with my boss, staff, clients and vendors for me to be outside the office. Like Debbie Gross, my executives counted on me to be their ‘eyes and ears’ and their ‘face’ to the world. Situations were constantly arising that needed my immediate attention. Leaving my desk to go pick up a sandwich at lunchtime could prove tricky. When I worked for bosses who were constantly traveling, on the rare days they were
scheduled to be in the office, I brought my lunch to work so I would not have to be away from my desk for more than a few minutes. Meetings were being set up, canceled or moved at a moment’s
notice, people would drop by unannounced, phone calls were being made, sometimes I was holding 2 or 3 calls at the same time, project approvals were needed, documents required signature, and there were always more travel arrangements to be made, changed or
canceled. Most executives I worked for were constantly calling out for me and I tried to always be within earshot, or have my assistant or someone listen out and let me know if I was being yelled for.  How would I have managed all this remotely?

I am currently working on a project with an assistant who is located remotely and I find it arduous. Work that should take 2 days is taking 5 or 6 due to the back and forth across international time zones. Yet, I am constantly meeting assistants who say they’ve negotiated with their executives to work remotely. Perhaps these executives have become accustomed to doing many tasks their assistants should be doing, or much of the work their assistants do for them is not of an urgent or time-sensitive nature.  Their assistants probably aren’t functioning as their liaison or deputy as I did, or as Gross and Pike did for their executives.

A big negative with the arrangement of assistants working remotely is the burden it places on assistants who are working at the office. I hear complaints that the remote assistants show themselves as “available”, but when they are contacted they don’t respond for hours, sometimes even an entire day goes by when they are not
responding to emails, texts or phone calls.  The urgency arises to schedule or re-schedule meetings, for example, but the assistant can’t be reached. If the executive is traveling, neither the executive nor their assistant can be reached and too much time is being spent by other assistants trying to contact them, cover for them, or
wasting time putting their own tasks on hold waiting for a response. I’ve inquired why these assistants don’t insist HR or the remote
assistant’s boss does something about it. HR tells them the boss agreed the assistant could work remotely when they hired them, so there’s nothing they can do. This is a cop-out by HR and the
executive. They must step up and consider the overall effects this situation has on the company. If this arrangement were impeding my workplace productivity, I would actively agitate for it to be changed. I would lobby HR not to allow executives to agree to letting their
assistants work remotely, but instead offer it as an option with
certain conditions, mainly that the assistant proves they are mature and responsible enough to warrant that privilege.

The bigger concern I have for assistants working remotely is how do they learn the business? How do they grow and expand in the role if they are not there to witness the daily ins and outs of the business environment? How do they develop a relationship of trust and
familiarity with their executive if they are not in physical proximity to each other? Ultimately, are they setting themselves up to become redundant? With warnings about A.I. and virtual assistants stepping in to fill many of the routine tasks assistants do, I would pay close
attention to developing skills and processes that make me more valuable and available to my executive.

The exception to this is assistants who have been with their
executive a long time, have built up a strong relationship with an
understanding of the business and each other. If the business is in a mature phase, or the executive’s role is such that they can be gone for periods of time, their assistants have the freedom to work remotely.

Penni mentioned that she thought assistants working remotely might get lonely. Debbie also addressed this from her experience at Cisco. “3 years ago I came to recognize that at Cisco, there was a whole administrative community that worked remotely and in
talking with several of these administrative professionals it became clear that they all felt a sense of isolation from the broader
administrative community.  As a result we pulled together this group and created an initiative known as G.R.A.C.E. – Global Remote
Administrators Connecting Effectively.  This is a group of remote
administrators who come together once a quarter to discuss the challenges they are facing, as well as review of best practices that help them feel connected.

“One of the key areas discussed was the challenge of developing a relationship with the leader because they were remote.  I strongly encourage administrative professionals who are working remotely to make it a point to travel to the corporate office at least once a year and even better, quarterly if they can, in order to ‘connect’ with their peers, meet the people they interface with across the
organization and become ‘visible’ – putting a face to the voice.  I also always suggest that remote administrators attend networking events and administrative conferences to learn and engage with
others in their profession. Working remotely certainly has its
advantages. However, administrative professionals can be even more effective by not isolating themselves. I feel that it is in our
administrative DNA that we connect with others and build strong relationships and that means we have to get out of ‘home-office’
environment to do that.  Many of Cisco’s G.R.A.C.E. members are now coming to the corporate office and networking with their peers, enriching their relationships and friendships and growing their knowledge and ultimately being of greater assistance to the leaders they support.”

Virtual Assistants: I often meet assistants who tell me they are
toying with the idea of trying out being a VA because they perceive it as a freeing experience. The purpose of including information about the VA profession in this article is to help assistants understand what it takes to survive and thrive as a VA.

Thanks to technology, there is a role for virtual assistants in the
business world. I remember from the pre-internet days, a friend of mine who worked at a large university would earn extra money
using her home computer to type students’ assignments, or
professors’ presentations. It stands to reason then, that with the freedom the internet offers us, that the virtual assistant profession would flourish.  Originally, this was a service that many
single-operator or small businesses used, but it is becoming more common for established businesses with ample resources to seek out the services of virtual assistants.

Penni Pike is an advisor for Time, etc., the virtual assistant service started in the UK, but now successfully established in the USA as well. Penni was brought on board by the company’s founder,
Barnaby Lashbrooke to guide them in setting up the business. He said Penni provided invaluable insight into how the EA-Executive
relationship should work and what kind of support executives need. Assistants chosen to work for Time, etc., go through a thorough
vetting process, not only for administrative skills, but for
inter-personal skills such as a client-focused viewpoint,
responsiveness to clients requests, attention to detail and so on. Their VAs are a mix of mid-to-high level, offering a range of skills that are “not all admin based, but include the strategic management side of business as well” said Barnaby.

He says the VA role is not suited for everyone. Many assistants are better suited to working in an office, so Time, etc., probes the prospective assistant’s reasons for wanting to be a VA. This is an
important aspect of the vetting process because it would be
disruptive if clients like working with a particular assistant and
develop an effective working relationship, only to find out the
assistant has moved on. Quality assistants with young families who need the flexibility of working from home, yet still need to bring in an income, are the most typical profile of a VA.

Anita Armas of Anita D. Armas Administrative Services from West Covina in California told me she started her VA business because she needed freedom and flexibility when she was looking for a way to be at home with her young children while still earning an income. Anita said, “I knew there was a way to use my skills and experience to do just that but wasn’t sure how, then I heard about virtual
assistants. My husband’s business was hit hard by the financial crisis of 2008 and I needed another way to bring in additional income, so I officially began marketing myself as a virtual assistant and I soon gained my first client.”

I asked Anita what mindset a person needs to be successful as a VA. “Aside from skills, in order to be successful as a virtual assistant one must be confident, resourceful, thick-skinned, adaptable, a great communicator and have a servant’s heart. As a VA business owner, my business success depends greatly on the success of my clients. A successful VA will not just be a “doer” but will be innovative and strategically invested in his or her clients business, in order to know how to best support their client. A willingness to learn and grow are key,” says Anita. She added that some of the pitfalls a VA can
experience include the client not seeing the VA as an autonomous business owner and leaning towards an employer/employee
mentality. The client feeling a sense of exclusivity, thinking they are the only client the VA has, and lack of communication between the VA and the client.

When assistants tell me they are considering becoming a VA, I
caution them that before they leave a secure, well-paying job with benefits and career advancement opportunities, they should
consider how the uncertainty of not immediately having a steady
income might impact them. They should consider whether or not they are cut out for working alone and whether they are sufficiently disciplined to get down to work every day when they have the
option to work at their own time and pace. It’s easy to romanticize being your own boss when you are operating from the safety of a
secure job. The reality of being self employed can be a wakeup call when you have to prospect for business, deal with unhappy clients, pay bills, collect payments and furnish your own healthcare. Many VAs thrive in the role and others, after a mild flirtation with
independence, gladly return to the security of a full time job.
Evaluate your skills, your disposition and your self-discipline
thoroughly before you venture into the VA world. It is not for
everyone, particularly if you decide not to work through a platform such as Time, etc., preferring to source business on your own.

What’s exciting about all this is the many options assistants of all
calibers and experience levels have at their disposal today.  When you get excited about the opportunities, be sure to think through the potential downsides, not just the upsides. Use this article to make a Pros and Cons list for yourself. I wish you success in whatever you decide.

Author: Jan Jones

©Copyright Jan Jones, 2015 “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ new book and visit her website: The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones


We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Google+ for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Holiday Travel Tips – Busiest Days to Fly

When planning your holiday travel for the months of November,
December and January, there are a few crucial dates to keep in mind.

The most popular holiday travel dates (indicated on the calendar above) are expected to be:

– November: 19th – 30th & December 1st

– December: 17th – 31st

– January: 1st – 6th

  • Due to the increased demand for private flights, the system can be strained. Aircraft, FBOs, pilots, flight crews, caterers, and ground transportation all are affected and planning ahead
    becomes essential. Because of the increased demand for private jets around the holidays, prices can jump. Booking earlier ensures you get the jet you want at the best price.
  • Weather can also play a critical role in how many flights are
    available during this time of year.
  • The majority of people chartering private jets are flying in the same direction during the holiday season. Generally, we see an
    increase in traffic heading north to south, but some the most
    popular destinations are Florida, Colorado, the Caribbean and New York.

So what does this mean for you? If you are planning to travel in the next few months, we highly recommend that you book your flights promptly to ensure the best options, pricing and aircraft are
available for your trip.

Don’t forget to follow us on our social media channels for the latest FlyPrivate news and information.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Understanding Jet Classes and What Each Offers

If you are looking for the right jet aircraft for your next trip, whether for business or pleasure, it is important to understand what class of jet will best suit your needs. Jet industry professionals group jet
aircraft into 6 classes consisting of: Heavy Jets, Super Midsize Jets, Midsize Jets, Light Jets, Very Light Jets, and Turboprops. Let’s
discuss the benefits of each class of jet to help you make the most
informed decision.

Heavy Jets

Heavy jets are appropriate when your party numbers fourteen (14) or fewer. Heavy Jets have the most luxurious onboard
accommodations, always including a galley and enclosed lavatory. These jets are generally the most comfortable for long-range trips and can include internet access, audio and video players, satellite phones and a range of other amenities. Additionally, the crew will usually include a cabin attendant.

Super Midsize Jets

Super Midsize jets are appropriate when you seek more range than a standard midsize but may not have the need for a heavy jet. Super Midsize jets will typically avoid a fuel stop on flights less than 2,500. Often Super Midsize jets are the fastest and most fuel efficient of the jet classes. These jets also include a wide variety of amenities similar to that of the heavy jets.

Hawker 800XP

Midsize Jets

Midsize jets are appropriate for parties of seven (7) or fewer and will typically avoid a fuel stop on flights less than 2,500 miles. The
Midsize jets are the most versatile in that they offer better fuel economy than the larger jet classes, but still offer many of the same amenities. Midsize jets are equipped with an enclosed lavatory.

Light Jets

Light jets are appropriate for parties of five (5) or fewer and will
typically avoid a fuel stop on flights less than 1,500 miles. Light jets are economical, have a quiet engine, and are a great option for short to mid-range flights. Because of their smaller size, light jets can land at smaller FBOs and airports to help get you closer to your
destination and often fly at higher altitudes. Luggage capacity is
limited.

Very Light Jets

Very Light Jets (VLJs) are small light aircraft that typically hold a small group of 4 or 5 passengers comfortably. The very light jets are a fairly new category of aircraft, and thus are equipped with the very latest in jet engine technology which delivers the speed, quality, and fuel efficiency that allow for a more cost effective means of private jet travel.

  • Average Range: 1,000-1,500 miles
  • Average Cruising Speed: 400 mph
  • Passenger Count: 4-6 seats
  • Average Baggage Capacity: 47 cubic feet
  • FlyPrivate Round Trip Hourly Rates: $1,500-$2,000
  • FlyPrivate One Way Trip Hourly Rates: Quoted per trip
  • Examples of Popular Very Light Jets: Phenom 100,
    Citation Mustang and the Eclipse 550

Turboprops

Turboprops are a great solution for trips less than 500 miles and for trips into airports with shorter runways. Seating varies by aircraft model from 4-8 passengers. Turboprops provide better performance on shorter runways, many models have larger cabins than Light jets. Some Turboprops have enclosed lavatories while others do not have any lavatory facilities.

Ask our experts which jet class they suggest for your next trip and we will be happy to provide you with a recommendation and free flight quote.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: What Makes Assistants Successful at Multitasking?

In this article, Author Jan Jones discusses multitasking as it relates to the Executive Assistant position.

FlyPrivate is a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings
valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do! 

FlyPrivate: We’ve been hearing that “multitasking” is a myth and we should stop trying to do multiple things at once. But I recall you saying that being good at multitasking was vital to your success as an
executive assistant. Can you clarify? 

Jan Jones: Yes, I did say that and I fully believe that multitasking – as it pertains to the role of the executive assistant – is a fine art that many executive assistants have perfected. But I should make the
distinction about what I mean regarding “multitasking” as it pertains to the executive assistant, as opposed to executives and others.

We now have scientific evidence that multitasking is impossible for our brains and that, in fact, when we think we are multitasking what’s happening is that our brains are almost instantaneously switching back and forth from one task to another. It happens so fast that we think we are doing more than one thing at a time. This is easy to prove. Try giving your full attention to reading an email at the same time you are trying to pay complete attention to a phone call you are having. You will soon become aware that both tasks are suffering and you have to stop doing one of them.

So when I say that being good at multitasking was vital to my success as an EA, it comes down to that ability to switch back and forth
between tasks at a remarkably rapid pace, and then quickly
regaining laser focus. It takes discipline and practice and is not something everyone can do effectively. But for me, and some
assistants I’ve observed, it seems to be less arduous. My opinion is that because of the demands of the EA role, assistants are
constantly multitasking and as a result have mastered the ability to switch from task to task very quickly, along with the ability to regain focus. Obviously, some are better at it than others. The key is not to multitask with projects that require 100% of your concentration. That will result in you making mistakes, doing the job poorly and
taking longer to do it. It helps to batch similar tasks so that it’s easier to switch back and forth, but realistically, EAs don’t always have that option when requests are piling up, so you end up devising your own system and style of working in order to get it all handled.

I think another part to the talent of multitasking as demonstrated by assistants is revealed in an article published in Scientific American in April 2010. The article says that the brain can keep tabs on two tasks at once, even though we can’t actually do two tasks at once. I think this ability to keep tabs on two tasks at once is crucial to EAs being successful in their job. I liken it to sleeping with one eye open. You’ve always got your eye on all those balls you are juggling, to make sure nothing gets dropped. Nothing escapes your attention. This is a
desirable talent and one that is highly developed in goal-oriented executive assistants.

The world of the EA is one of constant interruptions, and if you
support more than one executive, that’s even more applicable to you. But that’s the nature of our job. We don’t have the luxury of
taking ourselves off to some quiet corner where we can focus on one thing at a time, as the experts are constantly advising executives to do. Assistants have to operate in the thick of it all day and everyday, so we must get better and better at recovering our focus as our brains rapidly switch back and forth between tasks. I don’t know of any scientific evidence to back up my assertion, but I know from
personal experience that I’m quickly able to adjust back and forth. I’m sure other assistants have this capability as well, and I’d be
interested to hear from them about it.

Multitasking can be tiring and one clue to help reduce the stress it causes is to give your brain a re-set if you’ve been doing a lot of
multitasking. Take a break, or focus on one task only. I know this sounds like wishful thinking to assistants, particularly with the
current Covid lockdown, which is forcing assistants to multitask business and homelife demands. So you must allow your brain even a brief rest. Reduced stress allows your immune system to function better. I was just reading a conversation between a medical working group that includes surgeons and neuroscientists. This comment caught my eye. “Threats fire up the immune system. ‘Threats’ are all sorts of stuff. Viruses, bacteria, a bully, a difficult boss, your thoughts and repressed emotions. Thoughts and emotions are processed in the brain the same way as a physical threat. Anxiety also fires up the immune system.” So, please take a break and calm your nervous system.

Another clue to successful multitasking is to have a priority list. It will help you to meet your objectives. Sometimes, the most
important task may require the highest amount of concentration and time for completion. Knowing this, you can quickly knock off a bunch of lesser items that don’t require a lot of time or
concentration, and then get down to uninterrupted time with your key projects. With those lesser items completed, you’ve probably satisfied some of your stakeholders, and you won’t be anxious about all those other things you have left to do, while you are trying to
focus on the complex, big-ticket items.

It’s true, science has shown you lose time when you multitask. Time is lost as your brain switches back and forth between tasks. (Studies say as much as 40% in some cases). But you can learn to make up for those precious lost seconds by quickly regaining your focus. The ability to focus and not give way to needless distractions is a skill
assistants must develop, especially during these times where smart phones and social media platforms are purposely designed to
distract us by keeping us addicted to checking them constantly.

This is not a joke. Some brave souls in the technology arena are
finally speaking up about the way devices are programmed in order to addict us. We need to be vigilant about this so our devices don’t rule our lives in a negative way, destroying our ability to focus and putting us into overwhelm and overload.

EAs may wish to view the 60 Minutes piece on “Brain Hacking” where former Google product manager, Tristan Harris (also in the Netflix film “The Social Dilemma”) discusses how Silicon Valley
exploits neuroscience to keep us addicted to technology.
Ex-Facebook president Sean Parker says Facebook is designed to exploit human vulnerability, by creating things like the “like” button, which give users “a little dopamine hit” so they continue to upload content. These revelations are an eye opener and should give pause to every assistant to examine if they are using technology, or if
technology is using them. I repeatedly say to assistants that
technology is a tool to help you get better at what you do. It can’t be a substitute for the human skills the job requires. In this case the skill is focus which technology is inadequate for, because it
constantly distracts your focus and robs you of time. However, don’t overlook that technology may provide a solution if you are able to automate some of those repetitive tasks that slow your productivity.

Multitasking, even as we understand it scientifically today, will
continue to be an essential component in the arsenal of exceptional executive assistants. It’s not feasible for assistants to stop
multitasking, so get really good at it. Develop your ability to switch back and forth rapidly between tasks and quickly regain your focus. The benefits of learning to focus go far beyond multitasking. It
dramatically increases your productivity and the quality of your work. The partnership of focus with multitasking is a paramount skill for time-pressured assistants. Once you master this combined skill, you won’t resent interruptions because your remarkable ability to focus will help you to quickly get back on target again. And this
ability is why I say, despite the science, many executive assistants have multitasking down to a fine art.


©The CEO’s Secret Weapon. The ideas expressed in this article and any text extracted from “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” are the,
intellectual property and copyrighted to Jan Jones. All rights
reserved. No unauthorized usage or duplication by any means is permitted without the express consent of the author.

Author: Jan Jones

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New
Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received
widespread acclaim from executives and executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed international
executive assistant to well-known business people, including
personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is
passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless, practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ book and visit her website:
The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their
Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

The Challenger 850: Unrivaled Cabin Comforts

The Bombardier Challenger 850 was first certified in 2006 (as an upgrade to the Challenger 800) and is still in production today. This jet is unique because it was derived from the CRJ200 airliner and shares the same airframe and dual CE CF34-3B1 turbofan engines. The Challenger 850 can carry large loads over transcontinental
distances (i.e. New York to Los Angeles), making it a versatile heavy jet option for personal and business travelers alike. 

The spacious cabin is the same as the Global 6000, with a shorter range, often offering substantial cost savings. The Challenger 850’s cabin can be configured 3 ways to meet unique business
requirements and is laid out in 3 zones. It offers a well-equipped
galley and a full-sized, private deluxe lavatory for passengers, with an additional forward lavatory for the crew. The noise-reduction technology makes for a peaceful trip, while the addition of an audio/video system, internet access and satellite phone, make
conducting business in the air a breeze.

The Challenger 850’s cabin is very spacious with 6’1″ of standing height and measures over 7’2″ in width and 48’4″ in length. With 30% more cabin space than its closest competitor, this aircraft will
accommodate 12-15 passengers comfortably, as well as 2 crew members and a flight attendant. The Challenger 850 also has a
generous baggage compartment providing 115 cubic feet of internal
baggage space that is accessible during flight.

The Challenger 850 has a range of around 3,230 statute miles with 12 passengers on board, and flies at an average speed of 528 mph. The cockpit is equipped with a Rockwell Collins Pro Line 4 avionics system, an all-glass cockpit, dual digital radios, color weather radar and six display screens, offering the highest level of jet charter safety.  

The Challenger 850 offers the best combination of size, comfort and value and is a favorite of corporate and leisure passengers alike.

To request a Challenger 850 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be pleased to provide you with a flight quote for your next trip.

Challenger 850 Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Meet the Citation Sovereign

Citation Sovereign Exterior

In 2002, the Cessna Citation Sovereign took its first flight. Created to bridge the gap between the Citation Excel/XLS and the Citation X, the Sovereign falls in the Super Midsize Jet class and offers many impressive features.

The Citation Sovereign was designed to offer exceptional overall performance, while also providing unrivaled comfort and amenities for passengers. The Sovereign’s spacious interior is over 24 feet long and offers many amenities typical of a Heavy Jet, such as a full size refreshment center, several entertainment options and a full size lavatory. It can seat up to 8 passengers comfortably and the cabin height is tall enough at 5′ 8″ that most people can stand up. The
baggage space in the Citation Sovereign is unmatched compared to other Super Midsize Jets with 135 cubic feet of baggage space.

The Citation Sovereign has a truly impressive range with its coast-to-coast capabilities. The long range makes the Sovereign a
customer favorite because it compares to a Heavy Jet, but is more economical as far as fuel economy. It performs exceptionally well at high elevations and is very capable of take-off and landing from shorter runways.

Citation Sovereigns are also a favorite of pilots because of its many automatic features and easy handling.  With an improved wing
design that drastically improves airflow and lift capabilities, the
Sovereign is able to cruise  at speeds of 514 mph.  It is equipped with Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306C turbofan engines that are flat-rates to minimize noise pollution, and provide 5,600 lbs of thrust during takeoff. From the landing gear to the brake system and unique variable gearing mechanism that adjusts the jet’s flaps to optimal angles during flight, the Citation Sovereign is hard to beat in overall performance, comfort, versatility, and range.

Citation Sovereign Exterior

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on: 

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Photo IDs and U.S. Department of Transportation Update

Don’t Forget Your Photo ID!

The TSA (Transportation Safety Administration) requires that all passengers over the age of 18 provide proper identification prior to boarding an aircraft. This regulation also applies to private aircraft. Please make sure you have acceptable identification in the event the pilots ask you or your guests to provide it.

Prior to the trip your name is submitted to the TSA. The TSA checks all passenger names against individuals listed on the “no-fly” list. However, the crew may ask you or your guests to produce photo identification to confirm your identity.

The pilots may be mandated to check identification. There can be substantial fines for an operator who is found to be in
non-compliance. So please don’t take it personally if you are asked.

We can keep a copy of your license or other acceptable ID on file as back up in the event you lose or misplace it. Ask Client Services for details.

Don't Forget Your Photo ID!

Acceptable IDs include:

  • Driver’s licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent)
    • REAL ID
      • Beginning October 1, 2021:
        • If you plan to use your state-issued ID or license to fly within the U.S., make sure it is REAL ID compliant. If you are not sure if your ID complies with REAL ID, check with your state department of motor vehicles. For information by state, including where to obtain a REAL ID, visit the DHS REAL ID website and click your state on the map.
        • Every air traveler 18 years of age and older will need a REAL ID-compliant driver’s license, state-issued enhanced driver’s license, or another acceptable form of ID to fly within the United States.
  • U.S. Passport
  • U.S. Passport Card
  • DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
  • U.S. Department of Defense ID, including IDs issued to dependents
  • Permanent Resident Card
  • Border Crossing Card
  • State-issued Enhanced Driver’s License
  • Federally recognized, Tribal-Issued Photo ID
  • HSPD-12 PIV card
  • Foreign government-issued passport
  • Canadian provincial driver’s license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
  • Transportation worker identification credential
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)
  • U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential
  • Veteran Health Identification Card (VHIC)

This standardization of the list of accepted documents better aligns TSA with other DHS components, including Customs and Border Protection, and REAL ID benchmarks.

Consider FlyPrivate for your future private travel. We are always happy to discuss your trips or answer any questions.

Flight Request

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Discover the Always Popular Gulfstream IV

Gulfstream GIV-SP
Photo Credits to Gulfstream Aerospace

The Gulfstream IV is a superior heavy jet known for its
performance in terms of speed, range, cabin size and passenger
capacity. The GIV seats 12 and can travel 4,264 statute miles at
average speeds up to 534 mph. The Gulfstream IV was produced
after re-engineering the wing structure of the Gulfstream III. The GIV offers a standup cabin and a longer transcontinental range than the GIII, as well as a slightly larger baggage capacity and seating for one additional passenger.

The Gulfstream IV is very popular for long-haul family vacations, transcontinental trips, and golf outings because of its versatility. The GIV has the ability to fly for longer distances, but can conveniently maneuver into smaller airports so it can essentially travel anywhere.

The GIV has had several upgrades over the years including the
special purpose Gulfstream IV-SP and the later redesigned
Gulfstream G400 which has since been updated to the popular G450.

Gulfstream GIV

The Gulfstream IV features forward or rear galleys with ample space for meal service, a crew lavatory and an executive lavatory, a
stateroom with the option for 1-2 berthing divans in the rear of the aircraft, and a cabin attendant. The 169-cubic-foot baggage
compartment is internally and externally accessible and can easily accommodate passengers needs, even when flying with bulky
sporting equipment.

To request a GIV for your next trip, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with a flight quote.

Gulfstream IV Specifications

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: How Executive Assistants Get Their Executives to see Them as a “Business Partner”

In this article, Author Jan Jones discusses how Executive Assistants can work to be seen as a business partner to their Executives.

 FlyPrivate is a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings
valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do! 

FlyPrivate: How can executive assistants get their executives to see them as a “Business Partner?” What are some things executives do that show they respect their assistant as a business partner?

Jan Jones: I’m repeatedly asked “How can I be a secret weapon if my executive doesn’t see assistants that way?” “I can’t get my executive to notice me and acknowledge my contribution.” “My executive doesn’t know how to use me.” “How can I be a business partner to an executive who wants to do everything herself?”

The answer to the first part of your question is not straightforward, and these questions from assistants clearly demonstrate that. There are many misconceptions and misunderstandings about the term “business partner”, that present a barrier to the title being widely acknowledged and used, with respect to the EA role.

A major hurdle in that effort is that many executives – across the age spectrum and across the world – are reluctant to bestow the title, or consider the idea that their assistant is their business partner. When I’m consulting with those executives, I allay their concerns by
suggesting they view it for what it is – a collaboration, an alliance
between the executive and assistant, rather than seeing it as an
assistant giving themselves airs, or trying to presume an authority, or legitimacy they don’t have.

While there is a strong push by EA advocates in western countries for the title, I hear from our EA colleagues in other parts of the world that their executives won’t countenance such a title for an assistant. Indeed, in parts of the world assistants continue to be called
“secretary”, although that may be because the title is closer to the job being done, rather than disrespect towards the person
performing it, or the profession as a whole. I know cultural norms are a source of dismay for assistants in some countries. But our EA colleagues in exotic lands should take heart because Adam Fidler, the UK’s premier EA trainer, says that many UK executives also
resist calling an assistant a business partner. It’s not only a cultural impediment, other factors are in play. But that’s a lengthy discussion to be had at another time.

As we see from these EA questions, too many executives are
unaware about the caliber of assistance an assistant brings to the table. And the truth is, a percentage of executives don’t require or want that level of assistance. Often, it’s the executives who are
conversant with technology, but have yet to determine how they can widen the scope of their own jobs, beyond the task-based way they are currently doing it. They are so deep on their treadmill of
churning it out and getting it done, that they can’t stop for a moment to delegate, collaborate, or consider there may be an alternative. Many of these executives have never had an assistant before, they’ve never seen assistants who are role models of effectiveness, they’ve never been taught the purpose and value of an effective
assistant. So they can’t immediately see how an assistant can be of service to them.

Assistants: You’ve got a job to do educating your executives on the role you play and what you can do. Just because they’ve hired you, doesn’t mean they know how to use all the features that come with a product like you. They’ve bought something and have yet to read and understand the how-to manual.

My unending mantra to assistants is: Showing is Better Than Telling. Show them what you can do. Until you show them, they won’t know. Many have no idea because they’ve never seen it done. They don’t know that it can be done, let alone how it can be done. It’s up to you. Realize that partners don’t wait to be told what to do. They know what the business requires and they do whatever it takes. Business partners have an investment in the business. They have financial skin in the game. What’s your stake in the business in which you work? How are you helping to grow and build that business the way a financial business partner would? What are you bringing to the partnership in return for asking to be called a “partner?” This is an important question that you should be asking yourself. How are you stepping up to the role of business partner?

Showing is Better Than Telling. That’s why I wrote my book for
executives and not for assistants. It’s deliberately called “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders And Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness.” I did that because executives need to be educated on what an assistant can do. They need to realize they have a secret weapon ready for deployment right beside them. And it’s the job of every assistant to demonstrate every single day, just what an assistant can do. If you don’t teach them, how will they learn? That’s what I did with my executives. I showed them more and better ways to utilize the depth of my expertise. I demonstrated that I clearly understood the business, what they were trying to achieve and how I could add value. You can do that by speaking intelligently, using the language of the business or the industry. Make pertinent suggestions. Bring relevant matters to their attention. If you can
relieve them of making one more decision, do it. You have to play the role of educator. You can’t sit back passively and wait for people who haven’t got a clue, to magically get a clue. People believe what they see more than they believe what they hear. So let them see what you can do.

One highly experienced assistant was struggling to get her
executive’s attention to discuss how she could help this new
executive. Every time she tried, her executive would push her away with some excuse. And then it was another, and another thing that she just could not look up from. I suggested the assistant make a list of all areas she saw where she could take tasks away from the
executive. Give specific examples: Here are some areas where I
notice… Let them see exactly where they are getting bogged down, and how you can help them to reclaim that precious time. Give them the list and let them look it over at their convenience. Let them know you’d be happy to discuss when they are ready. Meanwhile, you keep performing to the very best of your ability and keep siphoning off things that you can handle to make their load lighter.

At one point in my career, while I was deciding on my next move, I did temporary work. I covered for assistants who were on vacation, maternity leave, sick leave, or while the executive was interviewing for a new assistant. Guess how many job offers I got. When I arrived at those organizations, I didn’t sit back and wait for the executive to give me tasks to perform. I immediately set about finding out how I could make it an easy transition for them. Some EAs, particularly the ones going on vacation, who didn’t want to come back to a mess, left helpful directions. But not always. I would start by checking out what was in their In-tray to see what action needed to be taken, and the Out-tray to see what had been completed and what needed to happen next. I looked at the correspondence. I went through the files, their contacts, everything that would get me immediately
familiar with that EA’s job. Then, with my list of questions, I would ask for time with the executive so I could get some direction and get down to work. Many were surprised at my proactive stance and most welcomed it. I heard repeated whispers that they were getting more work out of me than they got from their assistant. Those
executives got a long-overdue lesson in how an enterprising
assistant takes charge of her role. They needed to be shown – this is what I can do for you. For the middle managers who didn’t want to use me (their work was too important to give to a mere temp), I showed them the meaning of important. I would go to the chief
executive’s assistant, introduce myself and ask if I could help them. 99% of the time, their grateful answer was “sure”.

Here are some examples of how successful business leaders utilize their assistants as business partners. This is how you want to train and develop your executive. This is how you’ll partner with your
executive, by knowing what the best leaders do and gradually
coaxing your executive into doing the same.

Access: Smart leaders give the assistant full access. This access
allows the assistant to understand the business, their executive’s priorities, what they like or don’t like. The assistant learns by directly observing the executive’s decision-making process, their style of communication, their values and interests. This perspective will give you a compass for how to act on your executive’s behalf. Assistants who are granted access to their executive don’t hesitate to act as their proxy when required. Get around your executive. Show
interest. Ask questions. Make suggestions. Encourage your
executive to relinquish tasks to you. If you have to start small, then start small, but start.

Autonomy: Good leaders know when to become immersed in the details and when they should let someone else take the lead. They hire the right person and trust them to get the job done. These
executives share the vision, mission and goals and trust their
assistant to use their experience, skills and creativity to take it from there. If your executive hasn’t been loosening the reins, ask yourself why. Is it because they are micromanagers and mistrusting, or have you not shown any inclination or ability to be autonomous and make good decisions? If you are waiting for your executive to “let” you, you’ll be a long time waiting.

Confidence: Strong leaders boost their assistant’s confidence and give them opportunities to show initiative and learn new things. They notice what you do and give you credit. If you make a mistake, they guide you towards a better way. The best way to gain
confidence is to start taking on projects and working independently. The more you do, the more confident you’ll become. Don’t hesitate to ask for guidance if you don’t know, or if you run into trouble. Get accustomed to speaking up and sharing your opinion. Easy does it at first. Test the waters before you start dishing out advice or
suggestions, unless you are certain of what you are talking about and how it will be received. Even if your executive doesn’t respond to your initiative, keep practicing how to expand your reach, work independently and get involved. It will increase your value and help you as you progress in your career.

Kudos: Smart leaders champion their people and recognize their
efforts. They understand the caliber of performance you are
delivering and never take you for granted. They don’t hesitate to say thank you, or praise you for stellar performance and reward you with increased responsibility, remuneration, or something more
immediate like time off. Even in my first job, when I was a junior
secretary, my boss would once in a while give me an “early mark”. That’s Aussie-speak for leave early. A consideration so appreciated by a young woman who was working hard to learn the ropes and
impress her employers. It told me my efforts were being noticed and rewarded.

Respect: Top business leaders show courtesy and consideration to their assistant – in public and private. They listen to you. They value your input. They treat you as a professional.

Gratitude: Tuned-in leaders acknowledge the immense job their
assistants do on their behalf. Time after time, leaders have told me they could never do what they do without their assistant. In my book, management guru Ken Blanchard remarked, “Assistants give you the capacity to do so much more.” Great leaders remember to express their thanks, show consideration and once in a while, look for ways to reward their assistants.

These are some habits that for generations have enabled
extraordinary leaders to function at optimum levels, working
effectively with their exceptional assistants. If a mind shift is going to happen, it’s going to come from you and through you, dear
assistant. How successfully your executive makes the transition to seeing and accepting you as a “business partner”, is in your hands. The goal is to be treated as a professional, a respected business partner, with or without it being your official title.


©The CEO’s Secret Weapon. The ideas expressed in this article and any text extracted from “The CEO’s Secret Weapon” are the,
intellectual property and copyrighted to Jan Jones. All rights
reserved. No unauthorized usage or duplication by any means is permitted without the express consent of the author.

Author: Jan Jones

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New
Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received
widespread acclaim from executives and executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed international
executive assistant to well-known business people, including
personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is
passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless, practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ book and visit her website:
The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their
Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on:

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.